Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age. 

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, Canada


Impact Factor 5.8 CiteScore 14.4

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) is the pioneer open access eHealth journal, and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is a leading health services and digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Journal Impact Factor™ 5.8 (Clarivate, 2024)), ranking Q1 in both the 'Medical Informatics' and 'Health Care Sciences & Services' categories, and is also the largest journal in the field. The journal is ranked #1 on Google Scholar in the 'Medical Informatics' discipline. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care.

JMIR is indexed in all major literature indices including National Library of Medicine(NLM)/MEDLINE, Sherpa/Romeo, PubMed, PMCScopus, Psycinfo, Clarivate (which includes Web of Science (WoS)/ESCI/SCIE), EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others. The Journal of Medical Internet Research received a CiteScore of 14.4, placing it in the 95th percentile (#7 of 138) as a Q1 journal in the field of Health Informatics. It is a selective journal complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 10,000 submissions a year. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews). Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to a different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

As all JMIR journals, the journal encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee when publishing a subsequent results paper in any JMIR journal.

Be a widely cited leader in the digital health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Virtual Communities and Communities of Practice for Healthcare Providers

Hospitalization in psychiatric wards is a necessary step for many individuals experiencing severe mental health issues. However, being hospitalized can also be a stressful and unsettling experience. It is crucial to understand and address the various needs of hospitalized individuals with psychiatric disorders to promote their overall well-being and support their recovery.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Health care workers (HCWs) frequently face multiple stressors at work, particularly those working night shifts. HCWs who have experienced distress may find it difficult to adopt stress management approaches, even if they are aware of the effects of stress and coping processes. Therefore, an individualized intervention may be required to assist distressed HCWs in bridging the “knowledge-practice” gap in stress management and effectively alleviating stress symptoms.

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Clinical Information and Decision Making

With the progressive increase in aging populations, the use of opportunistic computed tomography (CT) scanning is increasing, which could be a valuable method for acquiring information on both muscles and bones of aging populations.

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Recruitment of Research Participants

Electronic informed consent (eIC) is increasingly used in clinical research due to several benefits including increased enrollment and improved efficiency. Within a learning health care system, a pilot was conducted with an eIC for linking data from electronic health records with national registries, general practitioners, and other hospitals.

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E-Health / Health Services Research and New Models of Care

Health care professionals receive little training on the digital technologies that their patients rely on. Consequently, practitioners may face significant barriers when providing care to patients experiencing digitally mediated harms (eg, medical device failures and cybersecurity exploits). Here, we explore the impact of technological failures in clinical terms.

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eHealth Literacy / Digital Literacy

During the COVID-19 pandemic, much misinformation and disinformation emerged and spread rapidly via the internet, posing a severe public health challenge. While the need for eHealth literacy (eHL) has been emphasized, few studies have compared the difficulties involved in seeking and using COVID-19 information between adult internet users with low or high eHL.

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Quality/Credibility of eHealth Information and Trust Issues

Retrospecting the trust gaps and their dynamics during the pandemic is crucial for understanding the root causes of postpandemic challenges and offers valuable insights into preparing for future public health emergencies. The COVID-19 pandemic eroded people’s trust in strangers and acquaintances, while their trust in family members remained relatively stable. This resulted in 2 trust gaps, namely, the family members–strangers trust gap and the family members–acquaintances trust gap. Widening trust gaps impede social integration and undermine the effective management of public health crises. However, little is known about how digital media use shaped trust gaps during a pandemic.

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Digital Health Reviews

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is the most common chronic autoimmune disease among children and adolescents. Telemedicine has been widely used in the field of chronic disease management and can benefit patients with T1DM. However, existing studies lack high-level evidence related to the effectiveness of telemedicine for glycemic control in children and adolescents with T1DM.

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Digital Health Reviews

Emerging evidence suggests that positive impacts can be generated when digital health interventions are designed to be responsive to the cultural and socioeconomic context of their intended audiences.

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Telehealth and Telemonitoring

Despite a recent rise in adoption, telemedicine consultations retention remains challenging, and aspects around the associated experiences and outcomes remain unclear. The need to further investigate these aspects was a motivating factor for conducting this scoping review.

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Electronic/Mobile Data Capture, Internet-based Survey & Research Methodology

In-depth interviews are a common method of qualitative data collection, providing rich data on individuals’ perceptions and behaviors that would be challenging to collect with quantitative methods. Researchers typically need to decide on sample size a priori. Although studies have assessed when saturation has been achieved, there is no agreement on the minimum number of interviews needed to achieve saturation. To date, most research on saturation has been based on in-person data collection. During the COVID-19 pandemic, web-based data collection became increasingly common, as traditional in-person data collection was possible. Researchers continue to use web-based data collection methods post the COVID-19 emergency, making it important to assess whether findings around saturation differ for in-person versus web-based interviews.

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Extended Reality, Virtual Reality and Virtual Worlds

Health prevention campaigns often face challenges in reaching their target audience and achieving the desired impact on health behaviors. These campaigns, particularly those aimed at reducing tobacco use, require rigorous evaluation methods to assess their effectiveness.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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