Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age. 

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria (Canada)

Rita Kukafka, DrPH, MA, FACMI, Professor, Biomedical Informatics and Sociomedical Sciences; Director, Laboratory for Precision Prevention, Columbia University, NY


Impact Factor 7.08

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) (founded in 1999, now in its 23rd year!), is the pioneer open access eHealth journal and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is a leading digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Journal Impact Factor™ 7.08 (Clarivate, 2022)) and is also the largest journal in the field. It is indexed in all major literature indices including Medline, PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Psycinfo, SCIE, JCR, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care. As a leading high-impact journal in its disciplines, ranking Q1 in both the 'Medical Informatics' and 'Health Care Sciences and Services' categories, it is a selective journal complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 6.000 submissions a year. Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to a different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

As all JMIR journals, the journal encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee when publishing a subsequent results paper in any JMIR journal.

Be a widely cited leader in the digitial health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Clinical Informatics

Electronic medical records (EMRs) of patients with lung cancer (LC) capture a variety of health factors. Understanding the distribution of these factors will help identify key factors for risk prediction in preventive screening for LC.

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Digital Health Reviews

Digital health resources have the potential to assist women in optimizing gestational weight gain (GWG) during pregnancy to improve maternal health outcomes.

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Telehealth and Telemonitoring

Following the Riyadh Declaration, digital health technologies were prioritized in many countries to address the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Digital health apps for telemedicine and video consultations help reduce potential disease spread in routine health care, including follow-up care in orthopedic and trauma surgery. In addition to the satisfaction, efficiency, and safety of telemedicine, its economic and environmental effects are highly relevant to decision makers, particularly for the goal of reaching carbon neutrality of health care systems.

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Infodemiology and Infoveillance

Suboptimal adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates have been attributed to parental perceptions of the HPV vaccine. The internet has been cited as a setting where misinformation and controversy about HPV vaccination have been amplified.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is one of the leading causes of neonatal readmission—especially severe hyperbilirubinemia and its complications—and it influences disease burden as well as neonatal and maternal health. Smartphones have been shown to have satisfactory accuracy in screening neonatal bilirubin levels, but the impact of this technology on neonatal health care service and maternal health outcomes is still unknown.

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E-Health Policy and Health Systems Innovation

Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is the most time-sensitive acute cardiac event that requires rapid dispatching and response. The medical priority dispatch system (MPDS), one of the most extensively used types of emergency dispatch systems, is hypothesized to provide better-quality prehospital emergency treatment. However, few studies have revealed the impact of MPDS use on the process of ACS care.

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Digital Health Reviews

Ongoing efforts worldwide to provide patients with patient-accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) have led to variability in adolescent and parental access across providers, regions, and countries. There is no compilation of evidence to guide policy decisions in matters such as access age and the extent of parent proxy access. In this paper, we outline our scoping review of different stakeholders’ (including but not limited to end users) views, use, and experiences pertaining to web-based access to electronic health records (EHRs) by children, adolescents, and parents.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) can improve the symptoms and psychological well-being of patients with breast cancer. However, standard MBIs are an 8-week program delivered face-to-face, which may be inconvenient for patients with cancer. Many attempts have been made to adapt MBIs to increase their accessibility for patients with cancer while maintaining their therapeutic components and efficacy.

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Theme Issue 2022: Chatbots and COVID-19

Depression has a high prevalence among young adults, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, mental health services remain scarce and underutilized worldwide. Mental health chatbots are a novel digital technology to provide fully automated interventions for depressive symptoms.

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Mobile Health (mhealth)

Thorough dietary assessment is essential to obtain accurate food and nutrient intake data yet challenging because of the limitations of current methods. Image-based methods may decrease energy underreporting and increase the validity of self-reported dietary intake. Keenoa is an image-assisted food diary that integrates artificial intelligence food recognition. We hypothesized that Keenoa is as valid for dietary assessment as the automated self-administered 24-hour recall (ASA24)–Canada and better appreciated by users.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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