Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age. 

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria (Canada)

Rita Kukafka, DrPH, MA, FACMI, Professor, Biomedical Informatics and Sociomedical Sciences; Director, Laboratory for Precision Prevention, Columbia University, NY


Impact Factor 7.08

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) (founded in 1999, now in its 23rd year!), is the pioneer open access eHealth journal and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is a leading digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Journal Impact Factor™ 7.08 (Clarivate, 2022)) and is also the largest journal in the field. It is indexed in all major literature indices including Medline, PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Psycinfo, SCIE, JCR, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care. As a leading high-impact journal in its disciplines, ranking Q1 in both the 'Medical Informatics' and 'Health Care Sciences and Services' categories, it is a selective journal complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 6.000 submissions a year. Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to a different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

As all JMIR journals, the journal encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee when publishing a subsequent results paper in any JMIR journal.

Be a widely cited leader in the digitial health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Randomized trials (Editor: G. Eysenbach)*

Seasonal influenza affects 5% to 15% of Americans annually, resulting in preventable deaths and substantial economic impact. Influenza infection is particularly dangerous for people with cardiovascular disease, who therefore represent a priority group for vaccination campaigns.

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Quality/Credibility of eHealth Information and Trust Issues

As of 2021, 89% of the Australian population are active internet users. Although the internet is widely used, there are concerns about the quality, accuracy, and credibility of health-related websites. A 2015 systematic assessment of infant feeding websites and apps available in Australia found that 61% of websites were of poor quality and readability, with minimal coverage of infant feeding topics and lack of author credibility.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Financial incentive interventions for improving physical activity have proven to be effective but costly. Deposit contracts (in which participants pledge their own money) could be an affordable alternative. In addition, deposit contracts may have superior effects by exploiting the power of loss aversion. Previous research has often operationalized deposit contracts through loss framing a financial reward (without requiring a deposit) to mimic the feelings of loss involved in a deposit contract.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Pharmacovigilance using real-world data (RWD), such as multicenter electronic health records (EHRs), yields massively parallel adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals. However, proper validation of computationally detected ADR signals is not possible due to the lack of a reference standard for positive and negative associations.

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Digital Health Reviews

Artificial intelligence (AI) is often heralded as a potential disruptor that will transform the practice of medicine. The amount of data collected and available in health care, coupled with advances in computational power, has contributed to advances in AI and an exponential growth of publications. However, the development of AI applications does not guarantee their adoption into routine practice. There is a risk that despite the resources invested, benefits for patients, staff, and society will not be realized if AI implementation is not better understood.

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JMIR Theme Issue: COVID-19 Special Issue

In recent years, the COVID-19 pandemic has brought great changes to public health, society, and the economy. Social media provide a platform for people to discuss health concerns, living conditions, and policies during the epidemic, allowing policymakers to use this content to analyze the public emotions and attitudes for decision-making.

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Digital Health Reviews

Gastrointestinal diseases are associated with substantial cost in health care. In times of the COVID-19 pandemic and further digitalization of gastrointestinal tract health care, mobile health apps could complement routine health care. Many gastrointestinal health care apps are already available in the app stores, but the quality, data protection, and reliability often remain unclear.

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Viewpoints and Perspectives

Human-centered design (HCD) is widely regarded as the best design approach for creating eHealth innovations that align with end users’ needs, wishes, and context and has the potential to impact health care. However, critical reflections on applying HCD within the context of eHealth are lacking. Applying a critical eye to the use of HCD approaches within eHealth, we present and discuss 9 limitations that the current practices of HCD in eHealth innovation often carry. The limitations identified range from limited reach and bias to narrow contextual and temporal focus. Design teams should carefully consider if, how, and when they should involve end users and other stakeholders in the design process and how they can combine their insights with existing knowledge and design skills. Finally, we discuss how a more critical perspective on using HCD in eHealth innovation can move the field forward and offer 3 directions of inspiration to improve our design practices: value-sensitive design, citizen science, and more-than-human design. Although value-sensitive design approaches offer a solution to some of the biased or limited views of traditional HCD approaches, combining a citizen science approach with design inspiration and imagining new futures could widen our view on eHealth innovation. Finally, a more-than-human design approach will allow eHealth solutions to care for both people and the environment. These directions can be seen as starting points that invite and support the field of eHealth innovation to do better and to try and develop more inclusive, fair, and valuable eHealth innovations that will have an impact on health and care.

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Theme Issue 2022: Chatbots and COVID-19

COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective in preventing severe disease and death but are underused. Interventions to address COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy are paramount to reducing the burden of COVID-19.

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e-Mental Health and Cyberpsychology

Online support communities have become an accessible way of gaining social, emotional, and informational support from peers and may be particularly useful for individuals with chronic conditions. To date, there have been few studies exploring the online support available for tic disorders, such as Tourette syndrome. An exploratory study looking at users’ experiences with using online support communities for tic disorders suggested that members used such communities to share experiences, information, and strategies for tic management.

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Chatbots and Conversational Agents

Conversational agents (CAs) are increasingly used in health care to deliver behavior change interventions. Their evaluation often includes categorizing the behavior change techniques (BCTs) using a classification system of which the BCT Taxonomy v1 (BCTTv1) is one of the most common. Previous studies have presented descriptive summaries of behavior change interventions delivered by CAs, but no in-depth study reporting the use of BCTs in these interventions has been published to date.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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Open Peer Review Period:

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Open Peer Review Period:

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