Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age. 

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, Canada


Impact Factor 7.4

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) is the pioneer open access eHealth journal and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is a leading health services and digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Journal Impact Factor™ 7.4 (Clarivate, 2023)) and is also the largest journal in the field. The journal is ranked #1 on Google Scholar in the 'Medical Informatics' discipline. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care.

JMIR is indexed in all major literature indices including National Library of Medicine(NLM)/MEDLINE, Sherpa/Romeo, PubMed, PMCScopus, Psycinfo, Clarivate (which includes Web of Science (WoS)/ESCI/SCIE), EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others. As a leading high-impact journal in its disciplines, ranking Q1 in both the 'Medical Informatics' and 'Health Care Sciences and Services' categories, it is a selective journal complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 6.000 submissions a year. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews). Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to a different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

As all JMIR journals, the journal encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee when publishing a subsequent results paper in any JMIR journal.

Be a widely cited leader in the digital health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Telehealth and Telemonitoring

The continuous monitoring and recording of patients’ pain status is a major problem in current research on postoperative pain management. In the large number of original or review articles focusing on different approaches for pain assessment, many researchers have investigated how computer vision (CV) can help by capturing facial expressions. However, there is a lack of proper comparison of results between studies to identify current research gaps.

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Viewpoints and Perspectives

Modern machine learning approaches have led to performant diagnostic models for a variety of health conditions. Several machine learning approaches, such as decision trees and deep neural networks, can, in principle, approximate any function. However, this power can be considered to be both a gift and a curse, as the propensity toward overfitting is magnified when the input data are heterogeneous and high dimensional and the output class is highly nonlinear. This issue can especially plague diagnostic systems that predict behavioral and psychiatric conditions that are diagnosed with subjective criteria. An emerging solution to this issue is crowdsourcing, where crowd workers are paid to annotate complex behavioral features in return for monetary compensation or a gamified experience. These labels can then be used to derive a diagnosis, either directly or by using the labels as inputs to a diagnostic machine learning model. This viewpoint describes existing work in this emerging field and discusses ongoing challenges and opportunities with crowd-powered diagnostic systems, a nascent field of study. With the correct considerations, the addition of crowdsourcing to human-in-the-loop machine learning workflows for the prediction of complex and nuanced health conditions can accelerate screening, diagnostics, and ultimately access to care.

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Mobile Health (mhealth)

Health apps are increasingly recognized as crucial tools for enhancing health care delivery. Many countries, particularly those in sub-Saharan Africa, can substantially benefit from using health apps to support self-management and thus help to achieve universal health coverage and the third sustainable development goal. However, most health apps published in app stores are of unknown or poor quality, which poses a risk to patient safety. Regulatory standards and guidance can help address this risk and promote patient safety.

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Demographics of Users, Social & Digital Divide

The digital health divide for socioeconomic disadvantage describes a pattern in which patients considered socioeconomically disadvantaged, who are already marginalized through reduced access to face-to-face health care, are additionally hindered through less access to patient-initiated digital health. A comprehensive understanding of how patients with socioeconomic disadvantage access and experience digital health is essential for improving the digital health divide. Primary care patients, especially those with chronic disease, have experience of the stages of initial help seeking and self-management of their health, which renders them a key demographic for research on patient-initiated digital health access.

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eHealth Literacy / Digital Literacy

The digitalization of public and health sectors worldwide is fundamentally changing health systems. With the implementation of digital health services in health institutions, a focus on digital health literacy and the use of digital health services have become more evident. In Denmark, public institutions use digital tools for different purposes, aiming to create a universal public digital sector for everyone. However, this digitalization risks reducing equity in health and further marginalizing citizens who are disadvantaged. Therefore, more knowledge is needed regarding patients’ digital practices and experiences with digital health services.

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Digital Health Reviews

Digital health technologies (dHTs) offer a unique opportunity to address some of the major challenges facing health care systems worldwide. However, the implementation of dHTs raises some concerns, such as the limited understanding of their real impact on health systems and people’s well-being or the potential risks derived from their use. In this context, health technology assessment (HTA) is 1 of the main tools that health systems can use to appraise evidence and determine the value of a given dHT. Nevertheless, due to the nature of dHTs, experts highlight the need to reconsider the frameworks used in traditional HTA.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Children whose parents have alcohol use problems are at an increased risk of several negative consequences, such as poor school performance, an earlier onset of substance use, and poor mental health. Many would benefit from support programs, but the figures reveal that only a small proportion is reached by existing support. Digital interventions can provide readily accessible support and potentially reach a large number of children. Research on digital interventions aimed at this target group is scarce. We have developed a novel digital therapist-assisted self-management intervention targeting adolescents whose parents had alcohol use problems. This program aims to strengthen coping behaviors, improve mental health, and decrease alcohol consumption in adolescents.

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Editorials*

Practitioners of digital health are familiar with disjointed data environments that often inhibit effective communication among different elements of the ecosystem. This fragmentation leads in turn to issues such as inconsistencies in services versus payments, wastage, and notably, care delivered being less than best-practice. Despite the long-standing recognition of interoperable data as a potential solution, efforts in achieving interoperability have been disjointed and inconsistent, resulting in numerous incompatible standards, despite the widespread agreement that fewer standards would enhance interoperability. This paper introduces a framework for understanding health care data needs, discussing the challenges and opportunities of open data standards in the field. It emphasizes the necessity of acknowledging diverse data standards, each catering to specific viewpoints and needs, while proposing a categorization of health care data into three domains, each with its distinct characteristics and challenges, along with outlining overarching design requirements applicable to all domains and specific requirements unique to each domain.

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e-Mental Health and Cyberpsychology

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a substantial increase in health information, which has, in turn, caused a significant rise in cyberchondria and anxiety among individuals who search for web-based medical information. To cope with this information overload and safeguard their mental well-being, individuals may adopt various strategies. However, the effectiveness of these strategies in mitigating the negative effects of information overload and promoting overall well-being remains uncertain.

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Telehealth and Telemonitoring

Numerous prior opinion papers, administrative electronic health record data studies, and cross-sectional surveys of telehealth during the pandemic have been published, but none have combined assessments of video visit success monitoring with longitudinal assessments of perceived challenges to the rapid adoption of video visits during the pandemic.

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Extended Reality, Virtual Reality and Virtual Worlds

Virtual reality (VR) interventions, based on cognitive behavioral therapy principles, have been proven effective as complementary tools in managing obesity and have been associated with promoting healthy behaviors and addressing body image concerns. However, they have not fully addressed certain underlying causes of obesity, such as a lack of motivation to change, low self-efficacy, and the impact of weight stigma interiorization, which often impede treatment adherence and long-term lifestyle habit changes. To tackle these concerns, this study introduces the VR self-counseling paradigm, which incorporates embodiment and body-swapping techniques, along with motivational strategies, to help people living with obesity effectively address some of the root causes of their condition.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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Open Peer Review Period:

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