Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria (Canada)

Rita Kukafka, DrPH, MA, FACMI, Professor, Biomedical Informatics and Sociomedical Sciences; Director, Laboratory for Precision Prevention, Columbia University, NY


Impact Factor 5.43

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) (founded in 1999, now in its 22nd year!), is the pioneer open access eHealth journal and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is the leading digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Impact Factor 2020: 5.43), ranking Q1 in the medical informatics category, and is also the largest journal in the field. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care. As a leading high-impact journal in its disciplines (health informatics and health services research), it is selective, but it is now complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 6.000 submissions a year. Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to a different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

Be a widely cited leader in the digitial health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Telehealth and Telemonitoring

Despite the growing prevalence of people with complex conditions and evidence of the positive impact of telemonitoring for single conditions, little research exists on telemonitoring for this population.

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Virtual Reality and Virtual Worlds

Cognitive deficits are present in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, and depression. Assessments used to measure cognition in these disorders are time-consuming, burdensome, and have low ecological validity. To address these limitations, we developed a novel virtual reality shopping task—VStore.

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Viewpoints and Perspectives

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, it has been reported that greater than 35% of patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 develop postacute sequelae of SARS CoV-2 (PASC). PASC is still a disease for which preliminary medical data are being collected—mostly measurements collected during hospital or clinical visits—and pathophysiological understanding is yet in its infancy. The disease is notable for its prevalence and its variable symptom presentation, and as such, management plans could be more holistically made if health care providers had access to unobtrusive home-based wearable and contactless continuous physiologic and physical sensor data. Such between-hospital or between-clinic data can quantitatively elucidate a majority of the temporal evolution of PASC symptoms. Although not universally of comparable accuracy to gold standard medical devices, home-deployed sensors offer great insights into the development and progression of PASC. Suitable sensors include those providing vital signs and activity measurements that correlate directly or by proxy to documented PASC symptoms. Such continuous, home-based data can give care providers contextualized information from which symptom exacerbation or relieving factors may be classified. Such data can also improve the collective academic understanding of PASC by providing temporally and activity-associated symptom cataloging. In this viewpoint, we make a case for the utilization of home-based continuous sensing that can serve as a foundation from which medical professionals and engineers may develop and pursue long-term mitigation strategies for PASC.

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Participatory Medicine & E-Patients

A platform designed to support the home management of oral anticancer treatments and provide a secure web-based patient–health care professional communication modality, ONCO-TreC, was tested in 3 cancer centers in Italy.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Web-based interventions for multiple health behavior change (MHBC) appear to be a promising approach to change unhealthy habits. Limited research has tested this assumption in promoting physical activity (PA) and fruit-vegetable consumption (FVC) among Chinese college students. Moreover, the timing of MHBC intervention delivery and the order of components need to be addressed.

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Innovations and Technology for Physical Activity Education

The use of activity trackers has significantly increased over the last few years. This technology has the potential to improve the levels of physical activity and health-related behaviors in older adults. However, despite the potential benefits, the rate of adoption remains low among older adults. Therefore, understanding how technology is perceived may potentially offer insight to promote its use.

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Telehealth and Telemonitoring

There has been rapid integration of telehealth into care delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, little is known about technology ownership, internet access and use for communication, and telehealth availability among cancer survivors, particularly those enrolled in Medicare.

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Personal Health Records, Patient-Accessible Electronic Health Records, Patient Portals

Mobile applications offer a new approach to personal health records, which are internet-based tools for patients to consolidate and manage their health information. The University of Pennsylvania Health System (UPHS) was one of the first health systems to participate in Apple Health Records (AHR), a prominent example of this new generation of personal health records.

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Infodemiology and Infoveillance

Current qualitative literature about the experiences of women dealing with urinary tract infections (UTIs) is limited to patients recruited from tertiary centers and medical clinics. However, traditional focus groups and interviews may limit what patients share. Using digital ethnography, we analyzed free-range conversations of an online community.

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Infodemiology and Infoveillance

Social media has been extensively used for the communication of health-related information and consecutively for the potential spread of medical misinformation. Conventional systematic reviews have been published on this topic to identify original articles and to summarize their methodological approaches and themes. A bibliometric study could complement their findings, for instance, by evaluating the geographical distribution of the publications and determining if they were well cited and disseminated in high-impact journals.

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Clinical Informatics

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) in the medical domain has attracted considerable research interest. Inference applications in the medical domain require energy-efficient AI models. In contrast to other types of data in visual AI, data from medical laboratories usually comprise features with strong signals. Numerous energy optimization techniques have been developed to relieve the burden on the hardware required to deploy a complex learning model. However, the energy efficiency levels of different AI models used for medical applications have not been studied.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Noncardiac chest pain has a high prevalence and is associated with reduced quality of life, anxiety, avoidance of physical activity, and high societal costs. There is a lack of an effective, low-cost, easy to distribute intervention to assist patients with noncardiac chest pain.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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