Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria (Canada)

Rita Kukafka, DrPH, MA, FACMI, Professor, Biomedical Informatics and Sociomedical Sciences; Director, Laboratory for Precision Prevention, Columbia University, NY


Impact Factor 5.43

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) (founded in 1999, now in its 22nd year!), is the pioneer open access eHealth journal and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is the leading digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Impact Factor 2020: 5.43), ranking Q1 in the medical informatics category, and is also the largest journal in the field. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care. As a leading high-impact journal in its disciplines (health informatics and health services research), it is selective, but it is now complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 6.000 submissions a year. Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to a different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

Be a widely cited leader in the digitial health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Elective colorectal cancer (CRC) surgeries offer enhanced surgical outcomes but demand high self-efficacy in prehabilitation and competency in self-care and disease management postsurgery. Conventional strategies to meet perioperative needs have not been pragmatic, and there remains a pressing need for novel technologies that could improve health outcomes.

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Review

Health systems and providers across America are increasingly employing telehealth technologies to better serve medically underserved low-income, minority, and rural populations at the highest risk for health disparities. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has invested US $386 million in comparative effectiveness research in telehealth, yet little is known about the key early lessons garnered from this research regarding the best practices in using telehealth to address disparities.

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Mobile Health (mhealth)

Walking is a simple but beneficial form of physical activity (PA). Self-monitoring and providing information about social norms are the 2 most widely used “mobile health (mHealth)” strategies to promote walking behavior. However, previous studies have failed to discriminate the effect of self-monitoring from the combination of the 2 strategies, and provide practical evidence within Chinese culture. Some essential moderators, such as gender and group identity, were also overlooked.

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Recruitment of Research Participants

Researchers face challenges in patient recruitment, especially for rare, fatal diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These challenges include obtaining sufficient statistical power as well as meeting eligibility requirements such as age, sex, and study proximity. Similarly, persons with ALS (PALS) face difficulty finding and enrolling in research studies for which they are eligible.

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Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs)

There is a general agreement on the importance of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This type of information is becoming increasingly important for the value assessment of health technology assessment agencies in evaluating the benefits of new health technologies, including medicines. However, HRQoL data are often limited, and additional sources that provide this type of information may be helpful.

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Medicine 2.0: Social Media, Open, Participatory, Collaborative Medicine

Today, academic social network sites' role in improving the quality of education and how investigators conduct their research has become more critical.

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Clinical Information and Decision Making

There is a pressing need for digital tools that can leverage big data to help clinicians select effective antibiotic treatments in the absence of timely susceptibility data. Clinical presentation and local epidemiology can inform therapy selection to balance the risk of antimicrobial resistance and patient risk. However, data and clinical expertise must be appropriately integrated into clinical workflows.

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Infodemiology and Infoveillance

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and the consequent “infodemic” increased concerns about Twitter’s role in advancing antivaccination messages, even before a vaccine became available to the public. New computational methods allow for analysis of cross-platform use by tracking links to websites shared over Twitter, which, in turn, can uncover some of the content and dynamics of information sources and agenda-setting processes. Such understanding can advance theory and efforts to reduce misinformation.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Many weight loss programs show short-term effectiveness, but subsequent weight loss maintenance is difficult to achieve. Digital technologies offer a promising means of delivering behavior change approaches at low costs and on a wide scale. The Navigating to a Healthy Weight (NoHoW) project, which was funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program, aimed to develop, test, and evaluate a digital toolkit designed to promote successful long-term weight management. The toolkit was tested in an 18-month, large-scale, international, 2×2 factorial (motivation and self-regulation vs emotion regulation) randomized controlled trial that was conducted on adults with overweight or obesity who lost ≥5% of their body weight in the preceding 12 months before enrollment into the intervention.

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Viewpoints and Perspectives

In digital medicine, patient data typically record health events over time (eg, through electronic health records, wearables, or other sensing technologies) and thus form unique patient trajectories. Patient trajectories are highly predictive of the future course of diseases and therefore facilitate effective care. However, digital medicine often uses only limited patient data, consisting of health events from only a single or small number of time points while ignoring additional information encoded in patient trajectories. To analyze such rich longitudinal data, new artificial intelligence (AI) solutions are needed. In this paper, we provide an overview of the recent efforts to develop trajectory-aware AI solutions and provide suggestions for future directions. Specifically, we examine the implications for developing disease models from patient trajectories along the typical workflow in AI: problem definition, data processing, modeling, evaluation, and interpretation. We conclude with a discussion of how such AI solutions will allow the field to build robust models for personalized risk scoring, subtyping, and disease pathway discovery.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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Open Peer Review Period:

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