Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria (Canada)

Rita Kukafka, DrPH, MA, FACMI, Professor, Biomedical Informatics and Sociomedical Sciences; Director, Laboratory for Precision Prevention, Columbia University, NY


Impact Factor 5.03

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) (founded in 1999, now in its' 22nd year!), is the pioneer open access eHealth journal and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is the leading digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Impact Factor 2019: 5.03), ranking Q1 in the medical informatics category, and is also the largest journal in the field. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care. As a leading high-impact journal in its disciplines (health informatics and health services research), it is selective, but it is now complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 6.000 submissions a year. Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

Be a widely cited leader in the digitial health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Information Retrieval

Health care professionals (HCPs) routinely have questions concerning the medications they are recommending. There are numerous resources available; however, each has its own advantages and disadvantages.

|
Article Thumbnail
Review

Evidence on technology-based psychological interventions (TBIs) for the acute treatment of depression is rapidly growing. Despite extensive research in this field, there is a lack of research determining effectiveness and acceptance of TBIs considering different application formats in people with a formally diagnosed depressive disorder.

|
Article Thumbnail
Robots in Healthcare

In recent years, robots have been considered a new tech industry that can be used to solve the shortage in human resources in the field of health care. Also, animal-assisted therapy has been used to provide assistance, companionship, and interaction among the elderly and has been shown to have a positive impact on their emotional and psychological well-being. Both pets and robots can provide dynamic communication and positive interaction patterns. However, preferences for middle-aged and older adults in this regard are not clear.

|
Article Thumbnail
Telehealth and Telemonitoring

Telemedicine has become a necessary component of clinical practice for the purpose of providing safer patient care during lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It has been used to support the health care needs of patients with COVID-19 and routine primary care patients alike. However, this change has not been fully consolidated.

|
Article Thumbnail
Infodemiology and Infoveillance

The data retrieved with the online search engine, Google Trends, can summarize internet inquiries into specified search terms. This engine may be used for analyzing inquiry peaks for different medical conditions and symptoms.

|
Article Thumbnail
Clinical Information and Decision Making

Sepsis is the leading cause of death in US hospitals. Compliance with bundled care, specifically serial lactates, blood cultures, and antibiotics, improves outcomes but is often delayed or missed altogether in a busy practice environment.

|
Article Thumbnail
Demographics of Users, Social & Digital Divide

In many countries, sex work is criminalized, driving sex work underground and leaving sex workers vulnerable to a number of occupational health and safety risks, including violence, assault, and robbery. With the advent of widely accessible information and communication technologies (ICTs), sex workers have begun to use electronic occupational health and safety tools to mitigate these risks.

|
Article Thumbnail
Innovations and Technology for Physical Activity Education

When studied in community-based samples, the association of physical activity with blood pressure (BP) remains controversial and is perhaps dependent on the intensity of physical activity. Prior studies have not explored the association of smartwatch-measured physical activity with home BP.

|
Article Thumbnail
Mobile Health (mhealth)

There is significant opportunity to improve the nutritional quality of foods packed in children’s school lunchboxes. Interventions that are effective and scalable targeting the school and home environment are therefore warranted.

|
Article Thumbnail
Viewpoints and Perspectives

Knowledge of how to design digital systems that are ergonomically sound, high in usability, and optimized for the user, context, and task has existed for some time. Despite this, there are still too many examples of new digital health care systems that are poorly designed and that could negatively affect both the work environment of health care staff and patient safety. This could be because of a gap between the theoretical knowledge of design and ergonomics and the practical implementation of this knowledge in procuring and developing digital health care systems. Furthermore, discussions of digitalization are often at a general level and risk neglecting the nature of direct interaction with the digital system. This is problematic since it is at this detailed level that work environment and patient safety issues materialize in practice. In this paper, we illustrate such issues with two scenarios concerned with contemporary electronic health care records, based on field studies in two health care settings. We argue that current methods and tools for designing and evaluating digital systems in health care must cater both to the holistic level and to the details of interaction and ergonomics. It must also be acknowledged that health care professionals are neither designers nor engineers, so expectations of them during the development of digital systems must be realistic. We suggest three paths toward a more sustainable digital work environment in health care: (1) better tools for evaluating the digital work environment in the field; (2) generic formulations of qualitative requirements related to usability and for adaptation to the user, context, and task, to be used in procurement; and (3) the introduction of digital ergonomics as an embracing concept capturing several of the ergonomic challenges (including physical, cognitive, and organizational aspects) involved in implementing and using digital systems.

|

Preprints Open for Peer-Review

|

Open Peer Review Period:

-

|

Open Peer Review Period:

-

|

Open Peer Review Period:

-

We are working in partnership with