Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria (Canada)

Rita Kukafka, DrPH, MA, FACMI, Professor, Biomedical Informatics and Sociomedical Sciences; Director, Laboratory for Precision Prevention, Columbia University, NY


Impact Factor 5.03

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR), now in its 21st year, is the pioneer open access eHealth journal and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is the leading digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Impact Factor 2019: 5.03), ranking Q1 in the medical informatics category, and is also the largest journal in the field. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care. As a leading high-impact journal in its disciplines (health informatics and health services research), it is selective, but it is now complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 6.000 submissions a year. Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

Be a widely cited leader in the digitial health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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JMIR Theme Issue 2020/21: COVID-19 Special Issue

Accompanying the rising rates of reported mental distress during the COVID-19 pandemic has been a reported increase in the use of digital technologies to manage health generally, and mental health more specifically.

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General Original Articles (Editor: G. Eysenbach)*

COVID-19 has plagued the globe, with multiple SARS-CoV-2 clusters hinting at its evolving epidemiology. Since the disease course is governed by important epidemiological parameters, including containment delays (time between symptom onset and mandatory isolation) and serial intervals (time between symptom onsets of infector-infectee pairs), understanding their temporal changes helps to guide interventions.

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General Original Articles (Editor: G. Eysenbach)*

Limited information is available about the present characteristics and dynamic clinical changes that occur in patients with COVID-19 during the early phase of the illness.

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General Original Articles (Editor: G. Eysenbach)*

Multimodal recruitment strategies are a novel way to increase diversity in research populations. However, these methods have not been previously applied to understanding the prevalence of menstrual disorders such as polycystic ovary syndrome.

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Clinical Information and Decision Making

Asthma affects a large proportion of the population and leads to many hospital encounters involving both hospitalizations and emergency department visits every year. To lower the number of such encounters, many health care systems and health plans deploy predictive models to prospectively identify patients at high risk and offer them care management services for preventive care. However, the previous models do not have sufficient accuracy for serving this purpose well. Embracing the modeling strategy of examining many candidate features, we built a new machine learning model to forecast future asthma hospital encounters of patients with asthma at Intermountain Healthcare, a nonacademic health care system. This model is more accurate than the previously published models. However, it is unclear how well our modeling strategy generalizes to academic health care systems, whose patient composition differs from that of Intermountain Healthcare.

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Clinical Information and Decision Making

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly encountered in clinical practice and is associated with poor patient outcomes and increased health care costs. Despite it posing significant challenges for clinicians, effective measures for AKI prediction and prevention are lacking. Previously published AKI prediction models mostly have a simple design without external validation. Furthermore, little is known about the process of linking model output and clinical decisions due to the black-box nature of neural network models.

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Virtual Reality and Virtual Worlds

Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is clinically proven to reduce morbidity and mortality; however, many eligible patients do not enroll in treatment. Furthermore, many enrolled patients do not complete their full course of treatment. This is greatly influenced by socioeconomic factors but is also because of patients’ lack of understanding of the importance of their care and a lack of motivation to maintain attendance.

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E-Health / Health Services Research and New Models of Care

Internet hospitals in China are in great demand due to limited and unevenly distributed health care resources, lack of family doctors, increased burdens of chronic diseases, and rapid growth of the aged population. The COVID-19 epidemic catalyzed the expansion of online health care services. In recent years, internet hospitals have been rapidly developed. Ping An Good Doctor is the largest, national online medical entry point in China and is a widely used platform providing online health care services.

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Online Dating, Sexual Health Behavior

Despite the prevalent use of geosocial networking dating apps (GNDAs), there is limited research on their impact on sexual health outcomes among young music festivals attendees.

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Clinical Information and Decision Making

Obtaining accurate clinical information about recent acute care visits is extremely important for outpatient providers. However, documents used to communicate this information are often difficult to use. This puts patients at risk of adverse events. Elderly patients who are seen by more providers and have more care transitions are especially vulnerable.

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Clinical Information and Decision Making

Asthma exerts a substantial burden on patients and health care systems. To facilitate preventive care for asthma management and improve patient outcomes, we recently developed two machine learning models, one on Intermountain Healthcare data and the other on Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) data, to forecast asthma-related hospital visits, including emergency department visits and hospitalizations, in the succeeding 12 months among patients with asthma. As is typical for machine learning approaches, these two models do not explain their forecasting results. To address the interpretability issue of black-box models, we designed an automatic method to offer rule format explanations for the forecasting results of any machine learning model on imbalanced tabular data and to suggest customized interventions with no accuracy loss. Our method worked well for explaining the forecasting results of our Intermountain Healthcare model, but its generalizability to other health care systems remains unknown.

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Artificial Intelligence

Undifferentiated type of early gastric cancer (U-EGC) is included among the expanded indications of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD); however, the rate of curative resection remains unsatisfactory. Endoscopists predict the probability of curative resection by considering the size and shape of the lesion and whether ulcers are present or not. The location of the lesion, indicating the likely technical difficulty, is also considered.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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