Published on in Vol 21, No 1 (2019): January

Preprints (earlier versions) of this paper are available at https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/11291, first published .
Assessing the Impact of a Social Marketing Campaign on Program Outcomes for Users of an Internet-Based Testing Service for Sexually Transmitted and Blood-Borne Infections: Observational Study

Assessing the Impact of a Social Marketing Campaign on Program Outcomes for Users of an Internet-Based Testing Service for Sexually Transmitted and Blood-Borne Infections: Observational Study

Assessing the Impact of a Social Marketing Campaign on Program Outcomes for Users of an Internet-Based Testing Service for Sexually Transmitted and Blood-Borne Infections: Observational Study

Mark Gilbert 1, 2, MD;  Travis Salway 1, 2, PhD;  Devon Haag 2, MSc;  Michael Kwag 3, BA;  Joshua Edward 4, PhD;  Mark Bondyra 2;  Joseph Cox 5, MD;  Trevor A Hart 6, 7, PhD;  Daniel Grace 6, PhD;  Troy Grennan 2, 8, MD;  Gina Ogilvie 1, 2, MD;  Jean Shoveller 1, PhD

1 School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia , Vancouver, BC, CA

2 British Columbia Centre for Disease Control , Vancouver, BC, CA

3 Community Based Research Centre for Gay Men's Health , Vancouver, BC, CA

4 Health Initiative for Men , Vancouver, BC, CA

5 Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, CA

6 Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto , Toronto, ON, CA

7 Department of Psychology, Ryerson University , Toronto, ON, CA

8 Division of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CA

Corresponding Author: