Published on in Vol 19, No 5 (2017): May

Health Surveys Using Mobile Phones in Developing Countries: Automated Active Strata Monitoring and Other Statistical Considerations for Improving Precision and Reducing Biases

Health Surveys Using Mobile Phones in Developing Countries: Automated Active Strata Monitoring and Other Statistical Considerations for Improving Precision and Reducing Biases

Health Surveys Using Mobile Phones in Developing Countries: Automated Active Strata Monitoring and Other Statistical Considerations for Improving Precision and Reducing Biases

Journals

  1. Hyder A, Wosu A, Gibson D, Labrique A, Ali J, Pariyo G. Noncommunicable Disease Risk Factors and Mobile Phones: A Proposed Research Agenda. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(5):e133 View
  2. Gibson D, Pereira A, Farrenkopf B, Labrique A, Pariyo G, Hyder A. Mobile Phone Surveys for Collecting Population-Level Estimates in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Literature Review. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(5):e139 View
  3. Greenleaf A, Gadiaga A, Guiella G, Turke S, Battle N, Ahmed S, Moreau C, Ngure K. Comparability of modern contraceptive use estimates between a face-to-face survey and a cellphone survey among women in Burkina Faso. PLOS ONE 2020;15(5):e0231819 View
  4. Torres-Quintero A, Vega A, Gibson D, Rodriguez-Patarroyo M, Puerto S, Pariyo G, Ali J, Hyder A, Labrique A, Selig H, Peñaloza R, Vecino-Ortiz A. Adaptation of a mobile phone health survey for risk factors for noncommunicable diseases in Colombia: a qualitative study. Global Health Action 2020;13(1):1809841 View
  5. Slater H, Campbell J, Stinson J, Burley M, Briggs A. End User and Implementer Experiences of mHealth Technologies for Noncommunicable Chronic Disease Management in Young Adults: Systematic Review. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(12):e406 View
  6. Ali J, Labrique A, Gionfriddo K, Pariyo G, Gibson D, Pratt B, Deutsch-Feldman M, Hyder A. Ethics Considerations in Global Mobile Phone-Based Surveys of Noncommunicable Diseases: A Conceptual Exploration. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(5):e110 View
  7. Jones L, Ballon P. Tracking changes in resilience and recovery after natural hazards: Insights from a high-frequency mobile-phone panel survey. Global Environmental Change 2020;62:102053 View
  8. Lau C, Lombaard A, Baker M, Eyerman J, Thalji L. How Representative Are SMS Surveys in Africa? Experimental Evidence From Four Countries. International Journal of Public Opinion Research 2019;31(2):309 View
  9. Pariyo G, Greenleaf A, Gibson D, Ali J, Selig H, Labrique A, Al Kibria G, Khan I, Masanja H, Flora M, Ahmed S, Hyder A, Maulik P. Does mobile phone survey method matter? Reliability of computer-assisted telephone interviews and interactive voice response non-communicable diseases risk factor surveys in low and middle income countries. PLOS ONE 2019;14(4):e0214450 View
  10. Pariyo G, Wosu A, Gibson D, Labrique A, Ali J, Hyder A. Moving the Agenda on Noncommunicable Diseases: Policy Implications of Mobile Phone Surveys in Low and Middle-Income Countries. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(5):e115 View
  11. Rosskam E, Hyder A. Using mHealth to Predict Noncommunicable Diseases: A Public Health Opportunity for Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(5):e129 View
  12. Clipman S, Wesolowski A, Gibson D, Agarwal S, Lambrou A, Kirk G, Labrique A, Mehta S, Solomon S. Rapid Real-time Tracking of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions and Their Association With Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Positivity: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic Pulse Study. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2020 View
  13. Hensen B, Mackworth-Young C, Simwinga M, Abdelmagid N, Banda J, Mavodza C, Doyle A, Bonell C, Weiss H. Remote data collection for public health research in a COVID-19 era: ethical implications, challenges and opportunities. Health Policy and Planning 2021;36(3):360 View