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Citing this Article

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Published on 15.01.14 in Vol 16, No 1 (2014): January

This paper is in the following e-collection/theme issue:

Works citing "Biological Calibration for Web-Based Hearing Tests: Evaluation of the Methods"

According to Crossref, the following articles are citing this article (DOI 10.2196/jmir.2798):

(note that this is only a small subset of citations)

  1. Chu Y, Cheng Y, Lai Y, Tsao Y, Tu T, Young ST, Chen T, Chung Y, Lai F, Liao W. A Mobile Phone–Based Approach for Hearing Screening of School-Age Children: Cross-Sectional Validation Study. JMIR mHealth and uHealth 2019;7(4):e12033
    CrossRef
  2. Stefanczyk MM, Oleszkiewicz A. It’s not you, it’s me – disgust sensitivity towards body odor in deaf and blind individuals. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 2020;
    CrossRef
  3. Thoms L, Collichia G, Girwidz R. Real-life physics: phonocardiography, electrocardiography, and audiometry with a smartphone. Journal of Physics: Conference Series 2019;1223:012007
    CrossRef
  4. Masalski M, Kipiński L, Grysiński T, Kręcicki T. Hearing Tests on Mobile Devices: Evaluation of the Reference Sound Level by Means of Biological Calibration. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2016;18(5):e130
    CrossRef
  5. Sorokowska A, Hummel T, Oleszkiewicz A. No Olfactory Compensation in Food-related Hazard Detection Among Blind and Deaf Adults: A Psychophysical Approach. Neuroscience 2020;440:56
    CrossRef
  6. Masalski M, Morawski K. Worldwide Prevalence of Hearing Loss Among Smartphone Users: Cross-Sectional Study Using a Mobile-Based App. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2020;22(7):e17238
    CrossRef
  7. Masalski M, Grysiński T, Kręcicki T. Hearing Tests Based on Biologically Calibrated Mobile Devices: Comparison With Pure-Tone Audiometry. JMIR mHealth and uHealth 2018;6(1):e10
    CrossRef
  8. Shafiro V, Hebb M, Walker C, Oh J, Hsiao Y, Brown K, Sheft S, Li Y, Vasil K, Moberly AC. Development of the Basic Auditory Skills Evaluation Battery for Online Testing of Cochlear Implant Listeners. American Journal of Audiology 2020;29(3S):577
    CrossRef
  9. Deshpande AK, Shimunova T. A Comprehensive Evaluation of Tinnitus Apps. American Journal of Audiology 2019;28(3):605
    CrossRef
  10. Oleszkiewicz A, Kupczyk T, Brañas-Garza P. Sensory impairment reduces money sharing in the Dictator Game regardless of the recipient’s sensory status. PLOS ONE 2020;15(3):e0230637
    CrossRef
  11. Bright T, Pallawela D. Validated Smartphone-Based Apps for Ear and Hearing Assessments: A Review. JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies 2016;3(2):e13
    CrossRef
  12. Paglialonga A, Tognola G, Pinciroli F. Apps for Hearing Science and Care. American Journal of Audiology 2015;24(3):293
    CrossRef
  13. Pieniak M, Lachowicz‐Tabaczek K, Masalski M, Hummel T, Oleszkiewicz A. Self‐rated sensory performance in profoundly deaf individuals. Do deaf people share the conviction about sensory compensation?. Journal of Sensory Studies 2020;35(4)
    CrossRef
  14. Thoms L, Colicchia G, Girwidz R. Audiometric Test with a Smartphone. The Physics Teacher 2018;56(7):478
    CrossRef
  15. Batte C, Olayanju T, Mukisa J, Namusobya MS, Alenoghena I, Sulaiman L, Tazifua EA, Oladele DM, Morton B. The accuracy of a mobile phone application (Wulira app) compared to standard audiometry in assessing hearing loss among patients on treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Uganda. Journal of the Pan African Thoracic Society 2020;1:20
    CrossRef