Published on in Vol 14, No 6 (2012): Nov-Dec

How Should Debriefing Be Undertaken in Web-Based Studies? Findings From a Randomized Controlled Trial

How Should Debriefing Be Undertaken in Web-Based Studies? Findings From a Randomized Controlled Trial

How Should Debriefing Be Undertaken in Web-Based Studies? Findings From a Randomized Controlled Trial

Authors of this article:

Jim McCambridge 1 ;   Kypros Kypri 2 Author Orcid Image ;   Amanda Wilson 2

Journals

  1. Kypri K, Wilson A, Attia J, Sheeran P, McCambridge J. Effects of study design and allocation on self-reported alcohol consumption: randomized trial. Trials 2015;16(1) View
  2. McCambridge J, Kypri K, Bendtsen P, Porter J. The Use of Deception in Public Health Behavioral Intervention Trials: A Case Study of Three Online Alcohol Trials. The American Journal of Bioethics 2013;13(11):39 View
  3. McCambridge J, Kypri K, Elbourne D. In randomization we trust? There are overlooked problems in experimenting with people in behavioral intervention trials. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 2014;67(3):247 View
  4. Wang J, Kitsis E. Tangling the Web: Deception in Online Research. The American Journal of Bioethics 2013;13(11):59 View
  5. Van Quaquebeke N, Salem M, van Dijke M, Wenzel R. Conducting organizational survey and experimental research online: From convenient to ambitious in study designs, recruiting, and data quality. Organizational Psychology Review 2022;12(3):268 View
  6. Verbeke K, Krawczyk T, Baeyens D, Piasecki J, Borry P. Informed Consent and Debriefing When Deceiving Participants: A Systematic Review of Research Ethics Guidelines. Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics 2023;18(3):118 View
  7. Ulfsdotter Gunnarsson K, Collier E, McCambridge J, Bendtsen M. Randomized study of two different consent procedures on recall: a study within a digital alcohol intervention trial. Trials 2024;25(1) View