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Citing this Article

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Published on 13.06.17 in Vol 19, No 6 (2017): June

This paper is in the following e-collection/theme issue:

Works citing "Too Far to Care? Measuring Public Attention and Fear for Ebola Using Twitter"

According to Crossref, the following articles are citing this article (DOI 10.2196/jmir.7219):

(note that this is only a small subset of citations)

  1. Deng Q, Liu Y, Liu X, Zhang H, Deng X. Social Media Usage During Disasters: Exploring the Impact of Location and Distance on Online Engagement. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness 2020;14(2):183
    CrossRef
  2. Karmegam D, Mappillairaju B. Spatio-temporal distribution of negative emotions on Twitter during floods in Chennai, India, in 2015: a post hoc analysis. International Journal of Health Geographics 2020;19(1)
    CrossRef
  3. Karmegam D, Ramamoorthy T, Mappillairajan B. A Systematic Review of Techniques Employed for Determining Mental Health Using Social Media in Psychological Surveillance During Disasters. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness 2020;14(2):265
    CrossRef
  4. Mavragani A. Tracking COVID-19 in Europe: Infodemiology Approach. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance 2020;6(2):e18941
    CrossRef
  5. Rajan A, Sharaf R, Brown RS, Sharaiha RZ, Lebwohl B, Mahadev S. Association of Search Query Interest in Gastrointestinal Symptoms With COVID-19 Diagnosis in the United States: Infodemiology Study. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance 2020;6(3):e19354
    CrossRef
  6. Dubey AD. Twitter Sentiment Analysis during COVID19 Outbreak. SSRN Electronic Journal 2020;
    CrossRef
  7. Sell TK, Hosangadi D, Trotochaud M. Misinformation and the US Ebola communication crisis: analyzing the veracity and content of social media messages related to a fear-inducing infectious disease outbreak. BMC Public Health 2020;20(1)
    CrossRef
  8. Kapitány-Fövény M, Ferenci T, Sulyok Z, Kegele J, Richter H, Vályi-Nagy I, Sulyok M. Can Google Trends data improve forecasting of Lyme disease incidence?. Zoonoses and Public Health 2019;66(1):101
    CrossRef
  9. Bempong N, Ruiz De Castañeda R, Schütte S, Bolon I, Keiser O, Escher G, Flahault A. Precision Global Health – The case of Ebola: a scoping review. Journal of Global Health 2019;9(1)
    CrossRef
  10. Deiner MS, Fathy C, Kim J, Niemeyer K, Ramirez D, Ackley SF, Liu F, Lietman TM, Porco TC. Facebook and Twitter vaccine sentiment in response to measles outbreaks. Health Informatics Journal 2019;25(3):1116
    CrossRef
  11. Mavragani A, Ochoa G. Google Trends in Infodemiology and Infoveillance: Methodology Framework. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance 2019;5(2):e13439
    CrossRef
  12. Mavragani A, Ochoa G, Tsagarakis KP. Assessing the Methods, Tools, and Statistical Approaches in Google Trends Research: Systematic Review. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2018;20(11):e270
    CrossRef
  13. Gianfredi V, Bragazzi NL, Nucci D, Martini M, Rosselli R, Minelli L, Moretti M. Harnessing Big Data for Communicable Tropical and Sub-Tropical Disorders: Implications From a Systematic Review of the Literature. Frontiers in Public Health 2018;6
    CrossRef
  14. Mavragani A, Ochoa G. Infoveillance of infectious diseases in USA: STDs, tuberculosis, and hepatitis. Journal of Big Data 2018;5(1)
    CrossRef
  15. Vijaykumar S, Nowak G, Himelboim I, Jin Y. Virtual Zika transmission after the first U.S. case: who said what and how it spread on Twitter. American Journal of Infection Control 2018;46(5):549
    CrossRef

According to Crossref, the following books are citing this article (DOI 10.2196/jmir.7219)

:
  1. Valdez R, Keim-Malpass J. Social Web and Health Research. 2019. Chapter 13:259
    CrossRef