Published on in Vol 19, No 5 (2017): May

Mobile Phone Surveys for Collecting Population-Level Estimates in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Literature Review

Mobile Phone Surveys for Collecting Population-Level Estimates in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Literature Review

Mobile Phone Surveys for Collecting Population-Level Estimates in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Literature Review

Journals

  1. Pariyo G, Wosu A, Gibson D, Labrique A, Ali J, Hyder A. Moving the Agenda on Noncommunicable Diseases: Policy Implications of Mobile Phone Surveys in Low and Middle-Income Countries. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(5):e115 View
  2. Greenleaf A, Ahmed S, Moreau C, Guiella G, Choi Y. Cell phone ownership and modern contraceptive use in Burkina Faso: implications for research and interventions using mobile technology. Contraception 2019;99(3):170 View
  3. Kajungu D, Hirose A, Rutebemberwa E, Pariyo G, Peterson S, Guwatudde D, Galiwango E, Tusubira V, Kaija J, Nareeba T, Hanson C. Cohort Profile: The Iganga-Mayuge Health and Demographic Surveillance Site, Uganda (IMHDSS, Uganda). International Journal of Epidemiology 2020;49(4):1082 View
  4. Hyder A, Wosu A, Gibson D, Labrique A, Ali J, Pariyo G. Noncommunicable Disease Risk Factors and Mobile Phones: A Proposed Research Agenda. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(5):e133 View
  5. Pattnaik A, Mohan D, Chipokosa S, Wachepa S, Katengeza H, Misomali A, Marx M. Testing the validity and feasibility of using a mobile phone-based method to assess the strength of implementation of family planning programs in Malawi. BMC Health Services Research 2020;20(1) View
  6. LeFevre A, Scott K, Mohan D, Shah N, Bhatnagar A, Labrique A, Dhar D, Chamberlain S, Ved R. Development of a Phone Survey Tool to Measure Respectful Maternity Care During Pregnancy and Childbirth in India: Study Protocol. JMIR Research Protocols 2019;8(4):e12173 View
  7. Pima F, Oshosen M, Ngowi K, Habte B, Maro E, Teffera B, Kisigo G, Swai I, Msangi S, Ermias A, Mmbaga B, Both R, Sumari-de Boer M. Feasibility of Using Short Message Service and In-Depth Interviews to Collect Data on Contraceptive Use Among Young, Unmarried, Sexually Active Men in Moshi, Tanzania, and Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Mixed Methods Study With a Longitudinal Follow-Up. JMIR Formative Research 2019;3(2):e12657 View
  8. Maffioli E. Collecting Data During an Epidemic: A Novel Mobile Phone Research Method. Journal of International Development 2020;32(8):1231 View
  9. Greenleaf A, Gadiaga A, Choi Y, Guiella G, Turke S, Battle N, Ahmed S, Moreau C. Automated and Interviewer-Administered Mobile Phone Surveys in Burkina Faso: Sociodemographic Differences Among Female Mobile Phone Survey Respondents and Nonrespondents. JMIR mHealth and uHealth 2020;8(7):e17891 View
  10. Ssemugabo C, Rutebemberwa E, Kajungu D, Pariyo G, Hyder A, Gibson D. Acceptability and Use of Interactive Voice Response Mobile Phone Surveys for Noncommunicable Disease Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance in Rural Uganda: Qualitative Study. JMIR Formative Research 2019;3(4):e15000 View
  11. Kreutzer T, Vinck P, Pham P, An A, Appel L, DeLuca E, Tang G, Alzghool M, Hachhethu K, Morris B, Walton-Ellery S, Crowley J, Orbinski J. Improving humanitarian needs assessments through natural language processing. IBM Journal of Research and Development 2020;64(1/2):9:1 View
  12. Pariyo G, Greenleaf A, Gibson D, Ali J, Selig H, Labrique A, Al Kibria G, Khan I, Masanja H, Flora M, Ahmed S, Hyder A, Maulik P. Does mobile phone survey method matter? Reliability of computer-assisted telephone interviews and interactive voice response non-communicable diseases risk factor surveys in low and middle income countries. PLOS ONE 2019;14(4):e0214450 View
  13. LeFevre A, Shah N, Bashingwa J, George A, Mohan D. Does women’s mobile phone ownership matter for health? Evidence from 15 countries. BMJ Global Health 2020;5(5):e002524 View
  14. Greenleaf A, Gadiaga A, Guiella G, Turke S, Battle N, Ahmed S, Moreau C, Ngure K. Comparability of modern contraceptive use estimates between a face-to-face survey and a cellphone survey among women in Burkina Faso. PLOS ONE 2020;15(5):e0231819 View
  15. Ali J, Labrique A, Gionfriddo K, Pariyo G, Gibson D, Pratt B, Deutsch-Feldman M, Hyder A. Ethics Considerations in Global Mobile Phone-Based Surveys of Noncommunicable Diseases: A Conceptual Exploration. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(5):e110 View
  16. Jones L, Ballon P. Tracking changes in resilience and recovery after natural hazards: Insights from a high-frequency mobile-phone panel survey. Global Environmental Change 2020;62:102053 View
  17. Ali J, DiStefano M, Coates McCall I, Gibson D, Al Kibria G, Pariyo G, Labrique A, Hyder A. Ethics of mobile phone surveys to monitor non-communicable disease risk factors in low- and middle-income countries: A global stakeholder survey. Global Public Health 2019;14(8):1167 View
  18. Greenleaf A, Gibson D, Khattar C, Labrique A, Pariyo G. Building the Evidence Base for Remote Data Collection in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Comparing Reliability and Accuracy Across Survey Modalities. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(5):e140 View
  19. Rosskam E, Hyder A. Using mHealth to Predict Noncommunicable Diseases: A Public Health Opportunity for Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2017;19(5):e129 View
  20. Drake A, Begnel E, Pintye J, Kinuthia J, Wagner A, Rothschild C, Otieno F, Kemunto V, Baeten J, John-Stewart G. The Utility of SMS to Report Male Partner HIV Self-testing Outcomes Among Women Seeking Reproductive Health Services in Kenya: Cohort Study. JMIR mHealth and uHealth 2020;8(3):e15281 View
  21. Lamanna C, Hachhethu K, Chesterman S, Singhal G, Mwongela B, Ng’endo M, Passeri S, Farhikhtah A, Kadiyala S, Bauer J, Rosenstock T, West B. Strengths and limitations of computer assisted telephone interviews (CATI) for nutrition data collection in rural Kenya. PLOS ONE 2019;14(1):e0210050 View
  22. Shah N, Mohan D, Agarwal S, Scott K, Chamberlain S, Bhatnagar A, Labrique A, Indurkar M, Ved R, LeFevre A, Evans D. Novel approaches to measuring knowledge among frontline health workers in India: Are phone surveys a reliable option?. PLOS ONE 2020;15(6):e0234241 View
  23. Torres-Quintero A, Vega A, Gibson D, Rodriguez-Patarroyo M, Puerto S, Pariyo G, Ali J, Hyder A, Labrique A, Selig H, Peñaloza R, Vecino-Ortiz A. Adaptation of a mobile phone health survey for risk factors for noncommunicable diseases in Colombia: a qualitative study. Global Health Action 2020;13(1):1809841 View
  24. Lau C, Lombaard A, Baker M, Eyerman J, Thalji L. How Representative Are SMS Surveys in Africa? Experimental Evidence From Four Countries. International Journal of Public Opinion Research 2019;31(2):309 View
  25. Tweheyo R, Selig H, Gibson D, Pariyo G, Rutebemberwa E. User Perceptions and Experiences of an Interactive Voice Response Mobile Phone Survey Pilot in Uganda: Qualitative Study. JMIR Formative Research 2020;4(12):e21671 View
  26. Rosevear E, Trebilcock M, Mota Prado M. The New Progressivism and its implications for institutional theories of development. Development Policy Review 2021;39(4):644 View
  27. Fischer F, Kleen S. Possibilities, Problems, and Perspectives of Data Collection by Mobile Apps in Longitudinal Epidemiological Studies: Scoping Review. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2021;23(1):e17691 View
  28. Rahman H, Matin I, Banks N, Hulme D. Finding out fast about the impact of Covid-19: The need for policy-relevant methodological innovation. World Development 2021;140:105380 View
  29. Hensen B, Mackworth-Young C, Simwinga M, Abdelmagid N, Banda J, Mavodza C, Doyle A, Bonell C, Weiss H. Remote data collection for public health research in a COVID-19 era: ethical implications, challenges and opportunities. Health Policy and Planning 2021;36(3):360 View
  30. Phadnis R, Wickramasinghe C, Zevallos J, Davlin S, Kumarapeli V, Lea V, Lee J, Perera U, Solórzano F, Vásconez J, Kotozaki Y. Leveraging mobile phone surveys during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ecuador and Sri Lanka: Methods, timeline and findings. PLOS ONE 2021;16(4):e0250171 View
  31. Ashigbie P, Rockers P, Laing R, Cabral H, Onyango M, Mboya J, Arends D, Wirtz V. Phone-based monitoring to evaluate health policy and program implementation in Kenya. Health Policy and Planning 2021;36(4):444 View
  32. Rinawan F, Susanti A, Amelia I, Ardisasmita M, Widarti , Dewi R, Ferdian D, Purnama W, Purbasari A. Understanding mobile application development and implementation for monitoring Posyandu data in Indonesia: a 3-year hybrid action study to build “a bridge” from the community to the national scale. BMC Public Health 2021;21(1) View
  33. Jayasimha K, Srivastava H, Manoharan S. Contamination fear and ABS during COVID-19. Journal of Services Marketing 2021;ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print) View
  34. Okeke E. Working Hard or Hardly Working: Health Worker Effort and Health Outcomes. Economic Development and Cultural Change 2021:000 View
  35. Vecino-Ortiz A, Nagarajan M, Katumba K, Akhter S, Tweheyo R, Gibson D, Ali J, Rutebemberwa E, Khan I, Labrique A, Pariyo G. A cost study for mobile phone health surveys using interactive voice response for assessing risk factors of noncommunicable diseases. Population Health Metrics 2021;19(1) View
  36. Gupta S, Seth P, Abraham M, Pingali P. COVID-19 and women's nutrition security: panel data evidence from rural India. Economia Politica 2021 View
  37. Greenleaf A, Mwima G, Lethoko M, Conkling M, Keefer G, Chang C, McLeod N, Maruyama H, Chen Q, Farley S, Low A. Participatory surveillance of COVID-19 in Lesotho via weekly calls: Protocol for cell phone data collection (Preprint). JMIR Research Protocols 2021 View
  38. Suich H, Yap M, Pham T. Coverage bias: the impact of eligibility constraints on mobile phone-based sampling and data collection. International Journal of Social Research Methodology 2021:1 View
  39. Nagpal K, Mathur M, Biswas A, Fraker A. Who do phone surveys miss, and how to reduce exclusion: recommendations from phone surveys in nine Indian states. BMJ Global Health 2021;6(Suppl 5):e005610 View