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Published on 24.05.00 in Vol 2, No 2 (2000)

This paper is in the following e-collection/theme issue:

    Policy Proposal

    e-Health Code of Ethics (May 24)

    Corresponding Authors:

    Helga Rippen, MD, PhD

    Internet Healthcare Coalition

    USA

    Email:


    Ahmad Risk, MD

    Internet Healthcare Coalition

    USA

    Email:


    ABSTRACT

    The Internet is changing how people receive health information and health care. All who use the Internet for health-related purposes must join together to create an environment of trusted relationships to assure high quality information and services; protect privacy; and enhance the value of the Internet for both consumers and providers of health information, products, and services. The goal of the e-Health Code of Ethics is to ensure that people worldwide can confidently and with full understanding of known risks realise the potential of the Internet in managing their own health and the health of those in their care. The final e-Health Code of Ethics, presented in this paper, has been prepared as a result of the "e-Health Ethics Summit," which convened in Washington DC on 31 January 2000 - 2 February 2000. The summit, organized by the Internet Healthcare Coalition and hosted by the World Health Organisation/Pan-American Health Organisation (WHO/PAHO), was attended by a panel of about 50 invited experts from all over the world and produced the foundation for a draft code, which was released 18 February [1] for an online public consultation period which ended on 14 April 2000. The final Washington e-Health Code of Ethics sets forth guiding principles under eight main headings: candor; honesty; quality; informed consent; privacy; professionalism in online health care; responsible partnering; and accountability.

    Note: Abstract, keywords, acknowledgements and references have been added by the editor and are not part of the final Code.

    J Med Internet Res 2000;2(2):e9)

    doi:10.2196/jmir.2.2.e9

    KEYWORDS



    Vision Statement

    The goal of the e-Health Code of Ethics is to ensure that people worldwide can confidently and with full understanding of known risks realise the potential of the Internet in managing their own health and the health of those in their care.


    Introduction

    The Internet is changing how people give and receive health information and health care. All people who use the Internet for health-related purposes-patients, health care professionals and administrators, researchers, those who create or sell health products or services, and other stakeholders-must join together to create a safe environment and enhance the value of the Internet for meeting health care needs.

    Because health information, products, and services have the potential both to improve health and to do harm, organisations and individuals that provide health information on the Internet have obligations to be trustworthy, provide high quality content, protect users' privacy, and adhere to standards of best practices for online commerce and online professional services in health care.

    People who use Internet health sites and services share a responsibility to help assure the value and integrity of the health Internet by exercising judgment in using sites, products, and services, and by providing meaningful feedback about online health information, products, and services.


    Definitions

    Health information includes information for staying well, preventing and managing disease, and making other decisions related to health and health care.

    • It includes information for making decisions about health products and health services.
    • It may be in the form of data, text, audio, and/or video.
    • It may involve enhancements through programming and interactivity.

    Health products include drugs, medical devices, and other goods used to diagnose and treat illnesses or injuries or to maintain health. Health products include both drugs and medical devices subject to regulatory approval by agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or U.K. Medicines Control Agency and vitamin, herbal, or other nutritional supplements and other products not subject to such regulatory oversight.

    Health services include specific, personal medical care or advice; management of medical records; communication between health care providers and/or patients and health plans or insurers, or health care facilities regarding treatment decisions, claims, billing for services, etc.; and other services provided to support health care.

    Health services also include listserves, bulletin boards, chat rooms, and other online venues for the exchange of health information.

    Like health information, health services may be in the form of data, text, audio, and/or video, and may involve enhancements through programming and interactivity.

    Anyone who uses the Internet for health-related reasons has a right to expect that organisations and individuals who provide health information, products or services online will uphold the following guiding principles:


    Guiding Principles

    Table 1. Guiding Principles
    View this table

    Acknowledgments

    The Internet Healthcare Coalition (IHC) provided the framework for the e-Health ethics summit in Washington DC, Jan 31 - Feb 2, 2000, chaired by Helga Rippen and Ahmad Risk.

    The following people were participants in the summit:

    Jaak Aru; Wendy Borow-Johnson; Mark Boulding; Allan Bruckheim; Mary Cain; Lynn Cates; Richard Cleland; Stefan J. Darmoni; Mary Jo Deering; Markus Dey; Donna Doneski; Gunther Eysenbach; Ruth Faden; Giles Frydman; Bruce Grant; Bruce Grobe; Jon Grohol; James Harris; John Hoben; Tom Houston; Sam Karp; Paul Keckly; Don Kemper; Murray Kopelow; Alex Langermann; Harry A. Levy; George Lundberg; John Mack; Blackford Middleton; Sandi Mitchell; Sybil Ingram Muhammad; Thomas Murray; Beth Nash; Tim Nater; David Nickelson; John Renner; Roberto Rodrigues; Mark Samuels; Michael H. Samuelson; Michael D. Scott; Denise Silber; Bill Silberg; Loretta Skucas; S. Stuart Spector; Mike Squires; Harry Sweeney; David B. Vance; C. Peter Waegemann; Group Facilitators were Kathy Alison, Laura Guyer Miller, Maria Nagorski and Maureen Ponte.

    Reference

    1. . e-Health Ethics Draft Code. J Med Internet Res 2000;2(1):e2 [FREE Full text] [CrossRef]

    Edited by G. Eysenbach; This is a non-peer-reviewed article. submitted 18.05.00; published 24.05.00

    © Helga Rippen, Ahmad Risk. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 24.5.2000. Except where otherwise noted, articles published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, including full bibliographic details and the URL (see "please cite as" above), and this statement is included.