Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for health and healthcare in the Internet age.

JMIR's Thomson Reuter Impact Factor of 4.7 for 2013

Cloud Computing Service Framework for Bioinformatics Tools

Background: With the rapid growth of biological technology, large amount of biological data can be produced in few days or months. Many of common-used tools become computation-consuming in analyzing such big biological data. Cloud computing has emerged to provide the huge amount of computing power and play important role in development of bioinformatics tools. Methods: We propose a cloud computing framework that is able to easily deploy the bioinformatics tools on cloud virtualization platform based on Hadoop. This framework can work on the public cloud platform vendor such as Amazon EC2 and also private cloud platform. All the tools performed by cloud computing framework as Bioinformatics as a Services are available at http://bioinfo.cs.pu.edu.tw/CBBTS. Results: The tools deployed on cloud platform by the proposed framework are tested in Providence University cloud platform and provided good proportional acceleration when scaled out onto many computational units. Conclusions: In the big biological data era, cloud computing based solutions are important role to develop bioinformatics services over internet. In the work, the proposed framework is able to simply deploy several well-known bioinformatics tools on cloud virtualization platform and as web services. This framework can work on the public cloud platform vendor such as Amazon EC2 and also private cloud platform.

2014-10-04

We are happy to announce the launch of our newly designed responsive website at www.jmir.org and its sister journals. The new stunning design, which features articles cards on the homepage, improved search functionality, easy switching between journals using a drop-down list, altmetrics, improved downloading of bibliographic data into personal reference managers, and other new features, has been in the works for 10 months. "Responsive" means that the website is automatically optimized for different screen sizes and devices, including mobile (change the width of the journal browser to see how this changes the layout).

"My ambition was to make JMIR the most cutting-edge, beautiful, and advanced academic journal site on the web", says Josh Flowers, Lead Designer and Director of User Experience at JMIR Publications.

Please tell us if we succeeded! Our feedback form is here - if you are a past author we also want to have quotes from you which we would like to feature on our slider on the homepage.

Our next steps are to redesign the backend which includes an easier submission and peer-review process.

JMIR Publications is a leading open access publisher based in Toronto, Canada, which publishes high-quality peer-reviewed journals since 1999. Learn more about us here.

Please tweet about how you like the new site, like these users:

Read Post

Recent Articles:

  • Supporting Health Care Professionals to Improve the Processes of Shared Decision Making and Self-Management in a Web-Based Intervention: Randomized...

    Abstract:

    Background: Research to assess the effect of interventions to improve the processes of shared decision making and self-management directed at health care professionals is limited. Using the protocol of Intervention Mapping, a Web-based intervention directed at health care professionals was developed to complement and optimize health services in patient-centered care. Objective: The objective of the Web-based intervention was to increase health care professionals’ intention and encouraging behavior toward patient self-management, following cardiovascular risk management guidelines. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was used to assess the effect of a theory-based intervention, using a pre-test and post-test design. The intervention website consisted of a module to help improve professionals’ behavior, a module to increase patients’ intention and risk-reduction behavior toward cardiovascular risk, and a parallel module with a support system for the health care professionals. Health care professionals (n=69) were recruited online and randomly allocated to the intervention group (n=26) or (waiting list) control group (n=43), and invited their patients to participate. The outcome was improved professional behavior toward health education, and was self-assessed through questionnaires based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Social-cognitive determinants, intention and behavior were measured pre-intervention and at 1-year follow-up. Results: The module to improve professionals’ behavior was used by 45% (19/42) of the health care professionals in the intervention group. The module to support the health professional in encouraging behavior toward patients was used by 48% (20/42). The module to improve patients’ risk-reduction behavior was provided to 44% (24/54) of patients. In 1 of every 5 patients, the guideline for cardiovascular risk management was used. The Web-based intervention was poorly used. In the intervention group, no differences in social-cognitive determinants, intention and behavior were found for health care professionals, compared with the control group. We narrowed the intervention group and no significant differences were found in intention and behavior, except for barriers. Results showed a significant overall difference in barriers between the intervention and the control group (F1=4.128, P=.02). Conclusions: The intervention was used by less than half of the participants and did not improve health care professionals’ and patients’ cardiovascular risk-reduction behavior. The website was not used intensively because of time and organizational constraints. Professionals in the intervention group experienced higher levels of barriers to encouraging patients, than professionals in the control group. No improvements were detected in the processes of shared decision making and patient self-management. Although participant education level was relatively high and the intervention was pre-tested, it is possible that the way the information was presented could be the reason for low participation and high dropout. Further research embedded in professionals’ regular consultations with patients is required with specific emphasis on the processes of dissemination and implementation of innovations in patient-centered care. Clinical Trial: Netherlands Trial Register Number (NTR): NTR2584; http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=2584 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6STirC66r).
  • A Case Study of the New York City 2012-2013 Influenza Season With Daily Geocoded Twitter Data From Temporal and Spatiotemporal Perspectives

    Abstract:

    Background: Twitter has shown some usefulness in predicting influenza cases on a weekly basis in multiple countries and on different geographic scales. Recently, Broniatowski and colleagues suggested Twitter’s relevance at the city-level for New York City. Here, we look to dive deeper into the case of New York City by analyzing daily Twitter data from temporal and spatiotemporal perspectives. Also, through manual coding of all tweets, we look to gain qualitative insights that can help direct future automated searches. Objective: The intent of the study was first to validate the temporal predictive strength of daily Twitter data for influenza-like illness emergency department (ILI-ED) visits during the New York City 2012-2013 influenza season against other available and established datasets (Google search query, or GSQ), and second, to examine the spatial distribution and the spread of geocoded tweets as proxies for potential cases. Methods: From the Twitter Streaming API, 2972 tweets were collected in the New York City region matching the keywords “flu”, “influenza”, “gripe”, and “high fever”. The tweets were categorized according to the scheme developed by Lamb et al. A new fourth category was added as an evaluator guess for the probability of the subject(s) being sick to account for strength of confidence in the validity of the statement. Temporal correlations were made for tweets against daily ILI-ED visits and daily GSQ volume. The best models were used for linear regression for forecasting ILI visits. A weighted, retrospective Poisson model with SaTScan software (n=1484), and vector map were used for spatiotemporal analysis. Results: Infection-related tweets (R=.763) correlated better than GSQ time series (R=.683) for the same keywords and had a lower mean average percent error (8.4 vs 11.8) for ILI-ED visit prediction in January, the most volatile month of flu. SaTScan identified primary outbreak cluster of high-probability infection tweets with a 2.74 relative risk ratio compared to medium-probability infection tweets at P=.001 in Northern Brooklyn, in a radius that includes Barclay’s Center and the Atlantic Avenue Terminal. Conclusions: While others have looked at weekly regional tweets, this study is the first to stress test Twitter for daily city-level data for New York City. Extraction of personal testimonies of infection-related tweets suggests Twitter’s strength both qualitatively and quantitatively for ILI-ED prediction compared to alternative daily datasets mixed with awareness-based data such as GSQ. Additionally, granular Twitter data provide important spatiotemporal insights. A tweet vector-map may be useful for visualization of city-level spread when local gold standard data are otherwise unavailable.
  • Use of Mobile Phone Text Message Reminders in Health Care Services: A Narrative Literature Review

    Abstract:

    Background: Mobile text messages are a widely recognized communication method in societies, as the global penetration of the technology approaches 100% worldwide. Systematic knowledge is still lacking on how the mobile telephone text messaging (short message service, SMS) has been used in health care services. Objective: This study aims to review the literature on the use of mobile phone text message reminders in health care. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review of studies on mobile telephone text message reminders. The data sources used were PubMed (MEDLINE), CINAHL, Proquest Databases/ PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and hand searching since 2003. Studies reporting the use of SMS intended to remind patients in health services were included. Given the heterogeneity in the studies, descriptive characteristics, purpose of the study, response rates, description of the intervention, dose and timing, instruments, outcome measures, and outcome data from the studies were synthesized using a narrative approach. Results: From 911 initial citations, 60 studies were included in the review. The studies reported a variety of use for SMS. Mobile telephone text message reminders were used as the only intervention in 73% (44/60) of the studies, and in 27% (16/60) of the remaining studies, SMS was connected to another comprehensive health intervention system. SMS reminders were sent to different patient groups: patients with HIV/AIDS (15%, 9/60) and diabetes (13%, 8/60) being the most common groups. The response rates of the studies varied from 22-100%. Typically, the text message reminders were sent daily. The time before the specific intervention to be rendered varied from 10 minutes (eg, medication taken) to 2 weeks (eg, scheduled appointment). A wide range of different evaluation methods and outcomes were used to assess the impact of SMS varying from existing databases (eg, attendance rate based on medical records), questionnaires, and physiological measures. About three quarters of the studies (77%, 46/60) reported improved outcomes: adherence to medication or to treatment reportedly improved in 40% (24/60) of the studies, appointment attendance in 18% (11/60) of the studies, and non-attendance rates decreased in 18% (11/60) of the studies. Other positive impacts were decreased amount of missed medication doses, more positive attitudes towards medication, and reductions in treatment interruptions. Conclusions: We can conclude that although SMS reminders are used with different patient groups in health care, SMS is less systematically studied with randomized controlled trial study design. Although the amount of evidence for SMS application recommendations is still limited, having 77% (46/60) of the studies showing improved outcomes may indicate its use in health care settings. However, more well-conducted SMS studies are still needed.
  • Tweeting for and Against Public Health Policy: Response to the Chicago Department of Public Health's Electronic Cigarette Twitter Campaign

    Abstract:

    Background: In January 2014, the Chicago City Council scheduled a vote on local regulation of electronic cigarettes as tobacco products. One week prior to the vote, the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) released a series of messages about electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) through its Twitter account. Shortly after the messages, or tweets, were released, the department’s Twitter account became the target of a “Twitter bomb” by Twitter users sending more than 600 tweets in one week against the proposed regulation. Objective: The purpose of our study was to examine the messages and tweet patterns in the social media response to the CDPH e-cigarette campaign. Methods: We collected all tweets mentioning the CDPH in the week between the e-cigarette campaign and the vote on the new local e-cigarette policy. We conducted a content analysis of the tweets, used descriptive statistics to examine characteristics of involved Twitter users, and used network visualization and descriptive statistics to identify Twitter users prominent in the conversation. Results: Of the 683 tweets mentioning CDPH during the week, 609 (89.2%) were anti-policy. More than half of anti-policy tweets were about use of electronic cigarettes for cessation as a healthier alternative to combustible cigarettes (358/609, 58.8%). Just over one-third of anti-policy tweets asserted that the health department was lying or disseminating propaganda (224/609, 36.8%). Approximately 14% (96/683, 14.1%) of the tweets used an account or included elements consistent with “astroturfing”—a strategy employed to promote a false sense of consensus around an idea. Few Twitter users were from the Chicago area; Twitter users from Chicago were significantly more likely than expected to tweet in support of the policy. Conclusions: Our findings may assist public health organizations to anticipate, recognize, and respond to coordinated social media campaigns.
  • What Are Health-Related Users Tweeting? A Qualitative Content Analysis of Health-Related Users and Their Messages on Twitter

    Abstract:

    Background: Twitter is home to many health professionals who send messages about a variety of health-related topics. Amid concerns about physicians posting inappropriate content online, more in-depth knowledge about these messages is needed to understand health professionals’ behavior on Twitter. Objective: Our goal was to characterize the content of Twitter messages, specifically focusing on health professionals and their tweets relating to health. Methods: We performed an in-depth content analysis of 700 tweets. Qualitative content analysis was conducted on tweets by health users on Twitter. The primary objective was to describe the general type of content (ie, health-related versus non-health related) on Twitter authored by health professionals and further to describe health-related tweets on the basis of the type of statement made. Specific attention was given to whether a tweet was personal (as opposed to professional) or made a claim that users would expect to be supported by some level of medical evidence (ie, a “testable” claim). A secondary objective was to compare content types among different users, including patients, physicians, nurses, health care organizations, and others. Results: Health-related users are posting a wide range of content on Twitter. Among health-related tweets, 53.2% (184/346) contained a testable claim. Of health-related tweets by providers, 17.6% (61/346) were personal in nature; 61% (59/96) made testable statements. While organizations and businesses use Twitter to promote their services and products, patient advocates are using this tool to share their personal experiences with health. Conclusions: Twitter users in health-related fields tweet about both testable claims and personal experiences. Future work should assess the relationship between testable tweets and the actual level of evidence supporting them, including how Twitter users—especially patients—interpret the content of tweets posted by health providers.
  • Posttreatment Attrition and Its Predictors, Attrition Bias, and Treatment Efficacy of the Anxiety Online Programs

    Abstract:

    Background: Although relatively new, the field of e-mental health is becoming more popular with more attention given to researching its various aspects. However, there are many areas that still need further research, especially identifying attrition predictors at various phases of assessment and treatment delivery. Objective: The present study identified the predictors of posttreatment assessment completers based on 24 pre- and posttreatment demographic and personal variables and 1 treatment variable, their impact on attrition bias, and the efficacy of the 5 fully automated self-help anxiety treatment programs for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods: A complex algorithm was used to diagnose participants’ mental disorders based on the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition, Text Revision; DSM-IV-TR). Those who received a primary or secondary diagnosis of 1 of 5 anxiety disorders were offered an online 12-week disorder-specific treatment program. A total of 3199 individuals did not formally drop out of the 12-week treatment cycle, whereas 142 individuals formally dropped out. However, only 347 participants who completed their treatment cycle also completed the posttreatment assessment measures. Based on these measures, predictors of attrition were identified and attrition bias was examined. The efficacy of the 5 treatment programs was assessed based on anxiety-specific severity scores and 5 additional treatment outcome measures. Results: On average, completers of posttreatment assessment measures were more likely to be seeking self-help online programs; have heard about the program from traditional media or from family and friends; were receiving mental health assistance; were more likely to learn best by reading, hearing and doing; had a lower pretreatment Kessler-6 total score; and were older in age. Predicted probabilities resulting from these attrition variables displayed no significant attrition bias using Heckman’s method and thus allowing for the use of completer analysis. Six treatment outcome measures (Kessler-6 total score, number of diagnosed disorders, self-confidence in managing mental health issues, quality of life, and the corresponding pre- and posttreatment severity for each program-specific anxiety disorder and for major depressive episode) were used to assess the efficacy of the 5 anxiety treatment programs. Repeated measures MANOVA revealed a significant multivariate time effect for all treatment outcome measures for each treatment program. Follow-up repeated measures ANOVAs revealed significant improvements on all 6 treatment outcome measures for GAD and PTSD, 5 treatment outcome measures were significant for SAD and PD/A, and 4 treatment outcome measures were significant for OCD. Conclusions: Results identified predictors of posttreatment assessment completers and provided further support for the efficacy of self-help online treatment programs for the 5 anxiety disorders. Trial Registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN121611000704998; http://www.anzctr.org.au/trial_view.aspx?ID=336143 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/618r3wvOG).
  • Promoting Health in Virtual Worlds: Lessons From Second Life

    Abstract:

    Background: Social media services can help empower people to take greater responsibility for their health. For example, virtual worlds are media-rich environments that have many technically advantageous characteristics that can be used for Health 2.0 purposes. Second Life has been used to build environments where people can obtain information and interact with other users for peer support and advice from health care professionals. Objective: The intent of the study was to find out whether Second Life is a working and functional platform supporting the empowerment of people in health-related issues. Methods: We conducted a review of the current health-related activity in Second Life, coupled with an extensive series of observations and interactions with the respective resources inside Second Life. Results: A total of 24 operative health resources were found in Second Life, indicating that health-related activity is rather limited in Second Life, though at first glance it appears to contain very rich health-related content. The other main shortcomings of Second Life relate to a lack of activity, a low number of resource users, problems with Second Life’s search features, and the difficulty of finding trustworthy information. Conclusions: For the average user, Second Life offers very little unique value compared to other online health resources.
  • Development and Preliminary Evaluation of an Internet-Based Healthy Eating Program: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Abstract:

    Background: The HealthValues Healthy Eating Programme is a standalone Internet-based intervention that employs a novel strategy for promoting behavior change (analyzing one’s reasons for endorsing health values) alongside other psychological principles that have been shown to influence behavior. The program consists of phases targeting motivation (dietary feedback and advice, analyzing reasons for health values, thinking about health-related desires, and concerns), volition (implementation intentions with mental contrasting), and maintenance (reviewing tasks, weekly tips). Objective: The aim was to examine the effects of the program on consumption of fruit and vegetables, saturated fat, and added sugar over a 6-month period. Methods: A total of 82 females and 18 males were recruited using both online and print advertisements in the local community. They were allocated to an intervention or control group using a stratified block randomization protocol. The program was designed such that participants logged onto a website every week for 24 weeks and completed health-related measures. Those allocated to the intervention group also completed the intervention tasks at these sessions. Additionally, all participants attended laboratory sessions at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. During these sessions, participants completed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ, the Block Fat/Sugar/Fruit/Vegetable Screener, adapted for the UK), and researchers (blind to group allocation) measured their body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and heart rate variability (HRV). Results: Data were analyzed using a series of ANOVA models. Per protocol analysis (n=92) showed a significant interaction for fruit and vegetable consumption (P=.048); the intervention group increased their intake between baseline and 6 months (3.7 to 4.1 cups) relative to the control group (3.6 to 3.4 cups). Results also showed overall reductions in saturated fat intake (20.2 to 15.6 g, P<.001) and added sugar intake (44.6 to 33.9 g, P<.001) during this period, but there were no interactions with group. Similarly, there were overall reductions in BMI (27.7 to 27.3 kg/m2, P=.001) and WHR (0.82 to 0.81, P=.009), but no interactions with group. The intervention did not affect alcohol consumption, physical activity, smoking, or HRV. Data collected during the online sessions suggested that the changes in fruit and vegetable consumption were driven by the motivational and maintenance phases of the program. Conclusions: Results suggest that the program helped individuals to increase their consumption of fruit and vegetables and to sustain this over a 6-month period. The observed reduction in fat and sugar intake suggests that monitoring behaviors over time is effective, although further research is needed to confirm this conclusion. The Web-based nature of the program makes it a potentially cost-effective way of promoting healthy eating.
  • Identifying Problematic Internet Users: Development and Validation of the Internet Motive Questionnaire for Adolescents (IMQ-A)

    Abstract:

    Background: Internationally, up to 15.1% of intensive Internet use among adolescents is dysfunctional. To provide a basis for early intervention and preventive measures, understanding the motives behind intensive Internet use is important. Objective: This study aims to develop a questionnaire, the Internet Motive Questionnaire for Adolescents (IMQ-A), as a theory-based measurement for identifying the underlying motives for high-risk Internet use. More precisely, the aim was to confirm the 4-factor structure (ie, social, enhancement, coping, and conformity motives) as well as its construct and concurrent validity. Another aim was to identify the motivational differences between high-risk and low-risk Internet users. Methods: A sample of 101 German adolescents (female: 52.5%, 53/101; age: mean 15.9, SD 1.3 years) was recruited. High-risk users (n=47) and low-risk users (n=54) were identified based on a screening measure for online addiction behavior in children and adolescents (Online-Suchtverhalten-Skala, OSVK-S). Here, “high-risk” Internet use means use that exceeds the level of intensive Internet use (OSVK-S sum score ≥7). Results: The confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the IMQ-A’s 4-factor structure. A reliability analysis revealed good internal consistencies of the subscales (.71 up to .86). Moreover, regression analyses confirmed that the enhancement and coping motive groups significantly predicted high-risk Internet consumption and the OSVK-S sum score. A mixed-model ANOVA confirmed that adolescents mainly access the Internet for social motives, followed by enhancement and coping motives, and that high-risk users access the Internet more frequently for coping and enhancement motives than low-risk users. Low-risk users were primarily motivated socially. Conclusions: The IMQ-A enables the assessment of motives related to adolescent Internet use and thus the identification of populations at risk. The questionnaire enables the development of preventive measures or early intervention programs, especially dealing with internal motives of Internet consumption.
  • A Comparison Between Phone-Based Psychotherapy With and Without Text Messaging Support In Between Sessions for Crisis Patients

    Abstract:

    Background: Few studies have tested whether individually tailored text messaging interventions have an effect on clinical outcomes when used to supplement traditional psychotherapy. This is despite the potential to improve outcomes through symptom monitoring, prompts for between-session activities, and psychoeducation. Objective: The intent of the study was to explore the use of individually tailored between-session text messaging, or short message service (SMS), as an adjunct to telephone-based psychotherapy for consumers who present to the Emergency Department (ED) in situational and/or emotional crises. Methods: Over a 4-month period, two therapists offered 68 prospective consumers of a telephone-based psychotherapy service individually tailored between-session text messaging alongside their telephone-based psychotherapy. Attendance and clinical outcomes (depression, anxiety, functional impairment) of those receiving messages were compared against a historical control group (n=157) who received telephone psychotherapy only. Results: A total of 66% (45/68) of the consumers offered SMS accepted the intervention. A total of 432 messages were sent over the course of the trial, the majority involving some kind of psychoeducation or reminders to engage in therapy goals. There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes between consumers who received the SMS and those in the control group. There was a trend for participants in the intervention group to attend fewer sessions than those in the control group (mean 3.7, SD 1.9 vs mean 4.4, SD 2.3). Conclusions: Both groups showed significant improvement over time. Individually tailored SMS were not found to improve clinical outcomes in consumers receiving telephone-based psychotherapy, but the study was underpowered, given the effect sizes noted and the significance level chosen. Given the ease of implementation and positive feedback from therapists and clients, individually tailored text messages should be explored further in future trials with a focus on enhancing the clinical impact of the tailored text messages, and utilizing designs with additional power to test for between-group effects.
  • Evaluating the Process of Online Health Information Searching: A Qualitative Approach to Exploring Consumer Perspectives

    Abstract:

    Background: The Internet is a common resource that patients and consumers use to access health-related information. Multiple practical, cultural, and socioeconomic factors influence why, when, and how people utilize this tool. Improving the delivery of health-related information necessitates a thorough understanding of users’ searching-related needs, preferences, and experiences. Although a wide body of quantitative research examining search behavior exists, qualitative approaches have been under-utilized and provide unique perspectives that may prove useful in improving the delivery of health information over the Internet. Objective: We conducted this study to gain a deeper understanding of online health-searching behavior in order to inform future developments of personalizing information searching and content delivery. Methods: We completed three focus groups with adult residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, which explored perceptions of online health information searching. Participants were recruited through flyers and classifieds advertisements posted throughout the community. We audio-recorded and transcribed all focus groups, and analyzed data using standard qualitative methods. Results: Almost all participants reported using the Internet to gather health information. They described a common experience of searching, filtering, and comparing results in order to obtain information relevant to their intended search target. Information saturation and fatigue were cited as main reasons for terminating searching. This information was often used as a resource to enhance their interactions with health care providers. Conclusions: Many participants viewed the Internet as a valuable tool for finding health information in order to support their existing health care resources. Although the Internet is a preferred source of health information, challenges persist in streamlining the search process. Content providers should continue to develop new strategies and technologies aimed at accommodating diverse populations, vocabularies, and health information needs.
  • Tweet Content Related to Sexually Transmitted Diseases: No Joking Matter

    Abstract:

    Background: Online social media, such as the microblogging site Twitter, have become a space for speedy exchange of information regarding sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), presenting a potential risk environment for how STDs are portrayed. Examining the types of “tweeters” (users who post messages on Twitter) and the nature of “tweet” messages is important for identifying how information related to STDs is posted in online social media. Objective: The intent of the study was to describe the types of message emitters on Twitter in relation to two different STDs—chlamydia and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)—as well as the nature of content tweeted, including how seriously the topic was treated. Methods: We used the Twitter search engine to look for tweets posted worldwide from August 1-7, 2013, and from September 1-7, 2013, containing the words “chlamydia” or “HIV”, and the hashtags “#chlamydia” or “#HIV”. Tweeters were classified by two independent reviewers according to the type of avatar of the user (human, logo, or fantasy), the identification of the emitter (identifiable, semi-identifiable, or non-identifiable), and the source (private company, general media, scientific media, non-governmental, individual account, academic institution, government department, or undefined). Tweet messages were also independently classified according to their nature (serious or jokes/funny), and whether their main message was factual or of a personal nature/experience. Results: A total of 694 tweets were posted by 426 different users during the first 7 days of August and September, containing the hashtags and/or simple words “chlamydia” and/or “HIV”. Jokes or funny tweets were more frequently posted by individual users (89%, 66/74), with a human avatar (81%, 60/74), from a non-identifiable user (72%, 53/74), and they were most frequently related to chlamydia (76%, 56/74). Serious tweets were most frequently posted by the general media (20.6%, 128/620), using a logo avatar (66.9%, 415/620), and with identifiable accounts (85.2%, 528/620). No government departments, non-governmental organizations, scientific media, or academic institutions posted a joke on STDs. A total of 104 of these analyzed tweets were re-tweeted messages, belonging to 68 unique tweets. The content was serious (99%, 67/68), factual (90%, 52/58), and about HIV (85%, 58/68). Conclusions: Social media such as Twitter may be an important source of information regarding STDs provided that the topic is presented appropriately. Reassuringly, the study showed that almost 9/10 of tweets on STDs (chlamydia and HIV) were of serious content, and many of the tweets that were re-tweeted were facts. The jokes that were tweeted were mainly about chlamydia, and posted by non-identifiable emitters. We believe social media should be used to an even larger extent to disseminate correct information about STDs.

Citing this Article

Right click to copy or hit: ctrl+c (cmd+c on mac)

Latest Submissions Open for Peer-Review:

View All Open Peer Review Articles
  • Cloud Computing Service Framework for Bioinformatics Tools

    Date Submitted: Oct 20, 2014

    Open Peer Review Period: Oct 21, 2014 - Dec 16, 2014

    Background: With the rapid growth of biological technology, large amount of biological data can be produced in few days or months. Many of common-used tools become computation-consuming in analyzing...

    Background: With the rapid growth of biological technology, large amount of biological data can be produced in few days or months. Many of common-used tools become computation-consuming in analyzing such big biological data. Cloud computing has emerged to provide the huge amount of computing power and play important role in development of bioinformatics tools. Methods: We propose a cloud computing framework that is able to easily deploy the bioinformatics tools on cloud virtualization platform based on Hadoop. This framework can work on the public cloud platform vendor such as Amazon EC2 and also private cloud platform. All the tools performed by cloud computing framework as Bioinformatics as a Services are available at http://bioinfo.cs.pu.edu.tw/CBBTS. Results: The tools deployed on cloud platform by the proposed framework are tested in Providence University cloud platform and provided good proportional acceleration when scaled out onto many computational units. Conclusions: In the big biological data era, cloud computing based solutions are important role to develop bioinformatics services over internet. In the work, the proposed framework is able to simply deploy several well-known bioinformatics tools on cloud virtualization platform and as web services. This framework can work on the public cloud platform vendor such as Amazon EC2 and also private cloud platform.

  • Patterns of technology use in patients attending a cardiopulmonary outpatient clinic: a self-report survey

    Date Submitted: Oct 20, 2014

    Open Peer Review Period: Oct 20, 2014 - Oct 30, 2014

    Background: The increasing burden of non-communicable diseases, such as heart disease and chronic respiratory disease, places increasing pressure on global health-care systems. Structured self-manage...

    Background: The increasing burden of non-communicable diseases, such as heart disease and chronic respiratory disease, places increasing pressure on global health-care systems. Structured self-management education for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure are primarily provided through time limited, face-to-face programs, with access limited to a small percentage of patients due to individual, provider and health system factors. Telecommunication tools are becoming an increasingly important component of healthcare delivery in the future. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and patterns of technology use in patients attending a cardiopulmonary clinic in an academic medical centre. Methods: A point prevalence survey was developed to collect data on participant demographics (age in years, sex, socio-economic status); access to computers, internet and smart phones; and use of current online health support sites or programs. Results: 123 surveys were collected between March and April 2014. The majority of respondents engaged in regular computer, smart phones and internet use, including accessing and browsing health sites and information. Participants most commonly accessed disease specific health sites, non-government organizations and research sites.. Online healthcare delivery was viewed as providing convenient, timely and easily accessible information, currently difficult to obtain through traditional face to face sources. Individuals additionally noted the benefit of peer support and sharing through this platform. Conclusions: Delivery of healthcare and information through telecommunication interfaces will be an increasingly important adjunct to traditional forms of healthcare delivery. The use of asynchronous and synchronous online interaction may go some way to alleviate the limitations in current healthcare access.

  • 'mAdherence' and Chronic Diseases Management: A Systematic Review

    Date Submitted: Oct 16, 2014

    Open Peer Review Period: Oct 17, 2014 - Dec 12, 2014

    Background: Adherence to chronic diseases management (CDM) is critical to achieving improved health outcomes, quality of life, and cost-effective health care. As the burden of chronic diseases continu...

    Background: Adherence to chronic diseases management (CDM) is critical to achieving improved health outcomes, quality of life, and cost-effective health care. As the burden of chronic diseases continues to grow globally, so does the impact of non-adherence. Mobile technologies are increasingly being used in health care and public health practice (mHealth) for patient communication, monitoring, and education, and to facilitate adherence to CDM. Objective: We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the effectiveness of mHealth in supporting the adherence of patients to CDM (“mAdherence”), and the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of mAdherence tools and platforms in CDM among patients and health care providers. Methods: We searched Pubmed, Embase, and EBSCO databases for studies that assessed the role of mAdherence in CDM of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic lung diseases from 1980 through May 2014. Outcomes of interest included effect of mHealth on patient adherence to CDM, disease-specific clinical outcomes after intervention, and the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of mAdherence tools and platforms in CDM among target end-users. Results: In all, 107 articles met all inclusion criteria. Short message service was the most commonly used mAdherence tool in 40% of studies. Usability, feasibility, and acceptability or patient preferences for mAdherence interventions were assessed in 58% of studies and found to be generally high. A total of 27 studies employed randomized controlled trial (RCT) methods to assess impact on adherence behaviors, and significant improvements were observed in 15 studies (56%). Of the 41 RCTs that measured effects on disease-specific clinical outcomes, significant improvements between groups were reported in 16 studies (39%). Conclusions: There is potential for mHealth tools to better facilitate adherence to CDM, but the evidence supporting its current effectiveness is mixed. Further research should focus on understanding and improving how mHealth tools can overcome specific barriers to adherence.

  • Usability and Feasibility of PIERS on the Move: An mHealth Application for Pre-eclampsia Triage

    Date Submitted: Oct 13, 2014

    Open Peer Review Period: Oct 14, 2014 - Dec 9, 2014

    Background: Pre-eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal death and morbidity in low-resource countries due to delays in case identification and a shortage of health workers trained to manage...

    Background: Pre-eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal death and morbidity in low-resource countries due to delays in case identification and a shortage of health workers trained to manage the disorder. PIERS on the Move (PotM) is a low cost, easy-to-use, mobile health (mHealth) platform that has been created to aid health workers in making decisions around the management of hypertensive pregnant women. PotM combines two previously successful innovations into a mHealth application: the miniPIERS risk assessment model and the Phone Oximeter™. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the usability of PotM (with mid-level health workers) for iteratively refining the system. Methods: Development of the PotM user interface involved usability testing with target end-users in South Africa. Users were asked to complete clinical scenario tasks, speaking aloud to give feedback on the interface and then complete a questionnaire. The tool was then evaluated in a pilot clinical evaluation in Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town. Results: After ethical approval and informed consent, 37 nurses and midwives evaluated the tool. During Study 1, major issues in the functionality of the touch-screen keyboard and date scroll wheels were identified (total errors n = 212); during Study 2 major improvements in navigation of the application were suggested (total errors n = 144). Overall, users felt the application was usable using the Computer Systems Usability Questionnaire; median (range) values for Study 1 = 2 (1 to 6) and Study 2 = 1 (1 to 7). PotM was used by one research nurse for the pilot clinical study. In total, more than 500 evaluations were performed on more than 200 patients. The median (interquartile range) time to complete an evaluation was 4min 55s (3min 25s to 6min 56s). Conclusions: By including target end-users in the design and evaluation of PotM, we have developed an application that can be easily integrated into health care settings in low- and middle- income countries. Usability problems were often related to smartphone features (e.g., scroll wheels, touch screen use). Larger scale evaluation of the clinical impact of this tool is underway.

  • Who follows eHealth interventions as recommended? A study of participants´ personal characteristics

    Date Submitted: Oct 8, 2014

    Open Peer Review Period: Oct 8, 2014 - Dec 3, 2014

    Background: Computer-tailored eHealth interventions to improve health behavior have been demonstrated to be effective and cost-effective, if they are used as recommended. However, different subgroups...

    Background: Computer-tailored eHealth interventions to improve health behavior have been demonstrated to be effective and cost-effective, if they are used as recommended. However, different subgroups may use the Internet differently, which might also affect intervention use and effectiveness. To date, there is little research available depicting whether adherence to intervention recommendations differs according to personal characteristics. Objective: To assess which personal characteristics are associated with using an eHealth intervention as recommended. Methods: A randomized, controlled trial was conducted, among a sample of the adult Dutch population (N=1,638), testing an intervention aimed at improving five healthy-lifestyle behaviors: increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, increasing physical activity, reducing alcohol intake, and promoting smoking cessation. Participants were asked to participate in those specific online modules for which they did not meet the national guideline(s) for the respective behavior(s). Participants who started with fewer than the recommended number of modules of the intervention were defined as users who did not follow the intervention recommendation. Results: The fewer modules were recommended to participate, the better participants adhered to the intervention modules. Following the intervention recommendation increased when participants were older (2 (1, 1464) = 39.81, P <.001), female (2 (1, 1464) = 15.88, P <.001), without paid work (2 (1, 1433) = 7.92, P =.003), ill (2 (1, 1435) = 4.51, P =.02), or in a relationship (2 (1, 1600) = 7.88, P =.003). No significant relevant differences were found between groups with different levels of education, incomes, or quality of life. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that eHealth interventions were used differently by sub-groups. The more frequent intervention use as recommended by unemployed, older, and ill participants may be an indication that these eHealth interventions are attractive to people with a greater need for healthcare information. Further research is necessary to make intervention use more attractive for people with unhealthy lifestyle patterns. Clinical Trial: Nederlands Trial Register: NTR 2168 http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=2168 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6MbUqttYB)

  • Identifying factors associated with dropout during pre-randomization run-in period from an mHealth physical activity intervention study - The mPED Trial

    Date Submitted: Oct 7, 2014

    Open Peer Review Period: Oct 8, 2014 - Dec 3, 2014

    Background: Applying mobile phone technologies to randomized controlled trials (RCT) of health behavior change has great potential to improve measurement and intervention methodologies. However, litt...

    Background: Applying mobile phone technologies to randomized controlled trials (RCT) of health behavior change has great potential to improve measurement and intervention methodologies. However, little is known about approaches to maximize mobile technology utilization for physical activity interventions. The mPED trial is an RCT evaluating a mobile phone-delivered physical activity intervention for women. Objective: 1) To determine the timing of dropout during run-in period, reasons for dropout optimum run-in duration and relevant run-in components and 2) to identify predictors of failure to complete the run-in period. Methods: 318 physically inactive women met preliminary eligibility criteria and were enrolled in the study between May 2011 and April 2014. A 3-week run-in period was required prior to randomization and included using a mobile phone app and wearing a pedometer. Cross-sectional analysis identified predictors of drop-out. Results: 108 (34%) dropped out prior to randomization, with poor adherence using the study equipment being the most common reason. Median failure time was 17 days into the run-in period. In multivariate competing risks models, not driving regularly in the past month and not having used a pedometer prior to the study were significantly associated with failure to be randomized (p = .041 and .006, respectively), after controlling for age, race, education, shift work, and use of a study-provided phone. Conclusions: Regular driving and past pedometer use were associated with reduced dropout during pre-randomization run-in period. Understanding these characteristics is important when interpreting results of this trial or designing a similar physical activity trial in the future. Clinical Trial: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01280812