Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age. 

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria (Canada)


Impact Factor 7.4

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) (founded in 1999, now in its 24th year!), is the pioneer open access eHealth journal and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is a leading digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Journal Impact Factor™ 7.4 (Clarivate, 2023)) and is also the largest journal in the field. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care.

JMIR is indexed in all major literature indices including MEDLINEPubMed/PMCScopus, Psycinfo, SCIE, JCR, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others. As a leading high-impact journal in its disciplines, ranking Q1 in both the 'Medical Informatics' and 'Health Care Sciences and Services' categories, it is a selective journal complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 6.000 submissions a year. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews). Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to a different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

As all JMIR journals, the journal encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee when publishing a subsequent results paper in any JMIR journal.

Be a widely cited leader in the digital health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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E-Health / Health Services Research and New Models of Care

People with a low socioeconomic position (SEP) are less likely to benefit from eHealth interventions, exacerbating social health inequalities. Professionals developing eHealth interventions for this group face numerous challenges. A comprehensive guide to support these professionals in their work could mitigate these inequalities.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

According to the World Health Organization, implementing mobile health (mHealth) technologies can increase access to quality health services worldwide. mHealth apps for smartphones, also known as health apps, are a central component of mHealth, and they are already used in diverse medical contexts. To benefit from health apps, potential users need specific skills that enable them to use such apps in a responsible and constructive manner.

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Viewpoints and Perspectives

Chronic pain, a common disease, is a crucial global public health concern. Approximately 20% of the worldwide population is affected by chronic pain, which accounts for 15% to 20% of hospital visits. In Canada, approximately 7.6 million people—or 1 in 5 people—experience chronic pain. Among this population, 60% has either lost their employment or experienced a reduction in income as a result of their pain. The proportion of older people (aged ≥65 years) with chronic pain is high, comprising one-third of the total older population. In addition, the causes of chronic pain and its cures are unknown, and treatment is limited by these unknowns and the dangers of opioids. These essential factors make patients with chronic pain one of the most vulnerable populations. The use of emerging virtual reality (VR) technology as an intervention for chronic pain has consistently demonstrated early effectiveness and has been termed as a “nonpharmacological analgesic.” Nevertheless, we must remain vigilant about the potential ethical risks of VR interventions, as inappropriate VR interventions may exacerbate the vulnerabilities of patients. Currently, a central challenge for VR developers is the ambiguity of patient vulnerability and the unpredictability of ethical dilemmas. Therefore, our paper focused on the vulnerability and ethical dilemmas faced by patients with chronic pain in VR interventions. Through an experience-based, prospective ethical examination, we have identified both existing and potential new vulnerabilities and specific manifestations that patients with chronic pain may encounter in VR interventions. Our aim was to highlight the ethical risks that may be present in VR interventions. On one hand, this can help raise awareness among technology developers regarding the vulnerabilities of patients with chronic pain and mitigate technological ethical risks. In addition, it can assist technology developers in determining the priorities for VR technology interventions. These efforts collectively lay a solid foundation for the comprehensive realization of responsible VR technology interventions.

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Digital Health Reviews

Persons diagnosed with serious chronic illnesses and their caretakers experience multiple types of financial costs that strain their income and generate financial distress. Many turn to medical crowdfunding (MCF) to mitigate the harms of these costs on their health and quality of life.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic, degenerative bone and joint disease. It can lead to major pressure to the quality of life and mental health of patients, and also brings a serious economic burden to society. However, it is difficult for patients with knee OA to access rehabilitation when discharging from the hospital. Internet-based rehabilitation is one of the promising telemedicine strategies for the improvement of knee OA, but the effect of different telerehabilitation strategies on knee OA is not clear.

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Clinical Information and Decision Making

Dementia has become a major public health concern due to its heavy disease burden. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a transitional stage between healthy aging and dementia. Early identification of MCI is an essential step in dementia prevention.

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Digital Health Reviews

Increased digital health and social care services are generally considered to improve people’s access to services. However, not everyone can equally access and use these resources. Health and social care professionals should assess clients’ suitability for digital solutions, but to succeed, they need information about what to evaluate and how.

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Peer-to-Peer Support and Online Communities

Users increasingly use social networking services (SNSs) to share their feelings and emotions. For those with mental disorders, SNSs can also be used to seek advice on mental health issues. One available SNS is Reddit, in which users can freely discuss such matters on relevant health diagnostic subreddits.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a common public health challenge. Health-promoting behaviors such as diet and physical activity are central to preventing and controlling MetS. However, the adoption of diet and physical activity behaviors has always been challenging. An individualized mobile health (mHealth)–based intervention using the Behavior Change Wheel is promising in promoting health behavior change and reducing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. However, the effects of this intervention are not well understood among people with MetS in mainland China.

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Artificial Intelligence

Although previous research has made substantial progress in developing high-performance artificial intelligence (AI)–based computer-aided diagnosis (AI-CAD) systems in various medical domains, little attention has been paid to developing and evaluating AI-CAD system in ophthalmology, particularly for diagnosing retinal diseases using optical coherence tomography (OCT) images.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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