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Currently submitted to: Journal of Medical Internet Research

Date Submitted: Sep 14, 2020
(closed for review but you can still tweet)

Warning: This is an author submission that is not peer-reviewed or edited. Preprints - unless they show as "accepted" - should not be relied on to guide clinical practice or health-related behavior and should not be reported in news media as established information.

More tailored advice is needed from providers to prevent COVID-19 and help ensure economic recovery.

  • Arash Naeim; 
  • Ryan Baxter-King; 
  • Neil Wenger; 
  • Annette Stanton; 
  • Karen Sepucha; 
  • Lynn Vavreck; 

ABSTRACT

Background:

With conflicting information about COVID-19, the general public may be uncertain about how to proceed in terms of precautionary behavior.

Objective:

To determine the factors associated with COVID-19 concern, precautionary behaviors, and willingness to return to activity.

Methods:

National survey data come from The Democracy Fund + UCLA Nationscape Project, an ongoing cross-sectional weekly survey. The sample was provided by Lucid, a market research online platform. The U.S. sample included 125,508 respondents. Individuals were surveyed between March 19 and August 5, 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic.Three outcomes were considered: (1) COVID-19 concern [C], (2) precautionary behaviors [P], and (3) willingness to return to activity [R]. Key independent variables included: age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, household income, political party identification, religion, news consumption, number of medication prescriptions, perceived COVID-19 status, and timing of peak COVID-19 infections by state.

Results:

The data include 125,508 online surveys conducted over 20 consecutive weeks (roughly 6,250 adults per week). A substantial number of people would not be willing to return to activity. Weighted multivariate logistic regressions indicated the following groups had different outcomes across (1) COVID-19 concern [C], (2) precautionary behaviors [P], and (3) willingness to return to activity [R] (all P < .0001): aged 65+ (OR 2.05[C], CI [1.93, 2.18] , OR 2.38[P] CI [2.02, 2.80] I, OR 0.41[R] CI [0.37-0.46], vs. 18-40); men (OR 0.73[C] CI [0.70, 0.75], OR 0.74[P] CI [0.67, 0.81], OR 2.00[R] CI [1.88-2.12] , vs. women); taking 4 or more medications (OR 1.47[C] CI [1.40, 1.54], OR 1.36[P] CI [1.20, 1.555], OR 0.75[R] CI [0.69-0.81], vs. < 3 medications); Republicans (OR 0.40[C] CI [0.38, 0.42], OR 0.45[P] CI [0.40, 0.50], OR 2.22[R] CI [2.09-2.36], vs. Democrats); and adults who reported having COVID-19 (OR. 1.25[C] CI [1.12, 1.39] OR 0.61[P], CI [0.52, 0.81]; OR 3.99[R] CI [3.48-4.58], vs. those that did not).

Conclusions:

Participants’ age, party affiliation, and perceived COVID-19 status were highly associated with COVID-related concern, precautionary behaviors, and return to activity. On the part of health care providers, better understanding is needed of patient attitudes and perceptions in order to tailor effective messages.


 Citation

Please cite as:

Naeim A, Baxter-King R, Wenger N, Stanton A, Sepucha K, Vavreck L

More tailored advice is needed from providers to prevent COVID-19 and help ensure economic recovery.

JMIR Preprints. 14/09/2020:24277

URL: https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/24277

Per the author's request the PDF is not available.