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Journal of Medical Internet Research

Citing this Article

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Published on 08.12.14 in Vol 16, No 12 (2014): December

This paper is in the following e-collection/theme issue:

Works citing "Nonprobability Web Surveys to Measure Sexual Behaviors and Attitudes in the General Population: A Comparison With a Probability Sample Interview Survey"

According to Crossref, the following articles are citing this article (DOI 10.2196/jmir.3382):

(note that this is only a small subset of citations)

  1. Mook P, McCormick J, Kanagarajah S, Adak GK, Cleary P, Elson R, Gobin M, Hawker J, Inns T, Sinclair C, Trienekens SCM, Vivancos R, McCarthy N. Online market research panel members as controls in case–control studies to investigate gastrointestinal disease outbreaks: early experiences and lessons learnt from the UK. Epidemiology and Infection 2018;146(04):458
    CrossRef
  2. Legleye S, Charrance G, Razafindratsima N, Bajos N, Bohet A, Moreau C. The Use of a Nonprobability Internet Panel to Monitor Sexual and Reproductive Health in the General Population. Sociological Methods & Research 2018;47(2):314
    CrossRef
  3. Geary RS, Tanton C, Erens B, Clifton S, Prah P, Wellings K, Mitchell KR, Datta J, Gravningen K, Fuller E, Johnson AM, Sonnenberg P, Mercer CH, Dalby AR. Sexual identity, attraction and behaviour in Britain: The implications of using different dimensions of sexual orientation to estimate the size of sexual minority populations and inform public health interventions. PLOS ONE 2018;13(1):e0189607
    CrossRef
  4. Wang-Schweig M, Miller BA, Buller DB, Byrnes HF, Bourdeau B, Rogers V. Using Panel Vendors for Recruitment Into a Web-Based Family Prevention Program: Methodological Considerations. Evaluation & the Health Professions 2017;:016327871774218
    CrossRef
  5. Anderssen N, Malterud K. Oversampling as a methodological strategy for the study of self-reported health among lesbian, gay and bisexual populations. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 2017;45(6):637
    CrossRef
  6. Sturgis P, Williams J, Brunton-Smith I, Moore J. Fieldwork Effort, Response Rate, and the Distribution of Survey Outcomes. Public Opinion Quarterly 2017;81(2):523
    CrossRef
  7. Couper MP. New Developments in Survey Data Collection. Annual Review of Sociology 2017;43(1):121
    CrossRef
  8. Blom AG, Herzing JME, Cornesse C, Sakshaug JW, Krieger U, Bossert D. Does the Recruitment of Offline Households Increase the Sample Representativeness of Probability-Based Online Panels? Evidence From the German Internet Panel. Social Science Computer Review 2017;35(4):498
    CrossRef
  9. Burkill S, Copas A, Couper MP, Clifton S, Prah P, Datta J, Conrad F, Wellings K, Johnson AM, Erens B, Cardoso MA. Using the Web to Collect Data on Sensitive Behaviours: A Study Looking at Mode Effects on the British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles. PLOS ONE 2016;11(2):e0147983
    CrossRef
  10. Friedland R, Afary J, Gardinali P, Naslund C. Love in the Middle East: The contradictions of romance in the Facebook World. Critical Research on Religion 2016;4(3):229
    CrossRef
  11. Sakshaug JW, Schmucker A, Kreuter F, Couper MP, Singer E. Evaluating Active (Opt-In) and Passive (Opt-Out) Consent Bias in the Transfer of Federal Contact Data to a Third-Party Survey Agency. Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology 2016;4(3):382
    CrossRef
  12. Erens B. Workshop Session: Maintaining Quality: Using Non-Probability web Surveys to Measure Sexual Behaviours and Attitudes in the British General Population: A Comparison with a Probability Sample Interview Survey. International Journal of Market Research 2015;57(2):300
    CrossRef